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Full text of "Elchanite (Brooklyn, New York, N.Y.), 1952"

JUNE 1952 



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Ci%PAlfrm.PiJ OF AlUf4N+ ACT+VlttES 

NEW ^dttK «ac t4. Y. 



(^Literature • ^^rt 
Senior ^^nnual 

USroolztun, Aune^ 52 





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Elchanite Staff 3 

Administration 4 

Faculty 5 

Graduating Classes 9 

Graduates 12 

Hall of Fame 36 

Diary 38^ 

Montage 40 

Activities 42 

Student Court 43 

G. O 44 

Arista 46 

Debating 48 

Service Squad 50 

Library 52 

Band 54 

T. A. Publications 55 

Athletics 56 

Literature 57 

Ode To Israel ... A Poem By Alan Scher 58 

Survival In The Forest ... By Moses Silberberg 59 

Fear ... A Poem By Melvin Zekfsky 61 

Syrian Jewry . . By Marvin Blackman 62 

Rembrandt And The Jews ... By Herzl Eisenstadt 63 

John Steinbeck ... By Herbert Dym 65 

Beethoven: A Study in Genius ... By Herbert Leibowitz 68 

Time ... A Poem By Joseph Kahane 70 

Education ... A Poem By Alan Seelenfreund 70 

The Expedition That Failed ... By Bernard Erlbaum 71 

Eternalized Words ... A Poem By Bernard Erlbaum 72 

Changing Views Of The American Revolution ... By Marvin Blackman 73 

Be Glad That You Were Born ... A Poem By Alan Scher 75 

State Scholarship Winners - 76 

Advertisements 77 




Editnr-in-Chief Joshua Teitelbauni 

Co-Editor ^Marvin Blackman 

A ctivities — ^Herbert Dym 

Herbert Leibowitz 

Jiff Leon Bernstein 

Bernard Nemerson 

Business Managers ^Alter Kevelson 

Morton Kwestel 
Harold Neustadter 
Alan Seelenfreund 



Photography 



-Morris Stillman 
Melvin Zelefsky 



Faculty Advisers Harry Allan 

Robert E. Bassell 

Rabbi Baruch N. Faivelson 

Art Associates Micha Botknecht 

Gilbert Goldfine 

Typing Squad Joseph Book 

Arthur Cantor 
Ishay Drazin 
Stanley Fischman 
George Klein 




DR. SAMUEL BELKIN 
President 




RABBI ABRAHAM N. ZUROFF 
Administrator 





DR. SHELLEY R. SAPHIRE 
Principal 



/IdfminUtMtioH 



m. t is with extreme joy that we congratulate the 
class of 1952. May you reflect in }our daily lives 
the harmonious blending of Torah knowledge and 
the wisdom of Hellas, with keener emphasis on 
the "beauty of holiness" rather than the "holiness 
of beauty". In this spirit we bid \ou farewell. 

THE ADMINISTRATION 



MR. SAMUEL LEVINE 
Executive Director 




MR. ALLAN 



MR. CANTOR 




MR. BASSELL 




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MR. EPSTi;iN 




RABBI I-A1\ l-.L^C)i\ 




MR. GODIN 



MR. GROSSMAN 




MR. GOLD 




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RABBI HERSKON ICS 




MR. JACOBS 





MR. KALLNER 



MR. LANDOWNE 




MR. LEBOWITZ 




MR. LILKER 




MR. TURETSKY 



MRS. LHVITON 




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^yruaustj 51 




SAMUEL BERGER 

Sam, whose Massad career was interrupted by 
school last summer, is now at Y.U. where he hopes 
to become a rabbi. It is rumored that he has al- 
ready agreed to officiate at Traub's wedding, but 
modest Sam denies the story. 

Happiness is the key to success. 



CHARLES COHEN 

Charlie, the "C" of C.B.S. and home-run hitting 
star of our Lag B'Omer outings, was the star pupil 
of a certain "old fossil" in his Biology days. A 
career in pharmacy is the ambition of this young 
man. 

A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin 
of little minds — Emerson. 




GILBERT DAVIDOWITZ 

"Divi", who numbers among his achievements 
at T.A. the titles of chief librarian and chief 
nuisance to Mrs. Leviton, was the T.V. expert of 
his class. Now a Political Science major at Y.U., 
Gil secretly hopes to be a composite Arthur God- 
frey, Bert Parks and Barry Gra)'. 

Knows all, sees all, hears all. 




WALTER HULKOWER 

MarVELous Vel, the guy with a good word for 
everybody, is another member of the Brooklyn 
delegation to T.I. One of four members of his 
class to make the basketball varsity in his high 
school days, Vel is also an accomplished accordion- 
ist and an ardent admirer of Dick Contino. 

When you're smiling, the whole world 
smiles with you. 




NEIL ISRAEL 

Nissan, another Massad-ite, is also a staunch "chav- 
er" of the Bnei Akiva. One of the three delegates 
(as his former history teacher would put it) from 
Crown Heights, Izzie, the Hebrew scholar of his 
class, is at present studying at Yeshiva U. 

Half a league, half a league onward, 
into the Land of ISRAEL. 



MARTIN LOWENHEIM 

The holder of the title of class Casanova, Me\er 
was also on the basketball varsit)' where he starred 
for two years. Meyer kept his classmates enter- 
tained with his excellent "trumpet" renditions. 

Happy melodist, unwearied, 
forever piping songs — Keats. 



13 




NATHAN OLSHIN 

The former Secretary-Treasurer of the G.O. is the 
only August '51er to become a Columbia man. 
Hailing from Boro Park and also a staunch 
Dodger fan, Natie may often be found imitating 
the second half of a famous team of "meshugin- 
ers". (We LIKE him, we LIKE him). 



Hail to thee blithe spirit 



Shelley 




HAROLD RIGHTMAN 

Harold, a fine Talmudist, was always on hand to 
help a friend in need. At many of our school 
functions Harold delighted us with his fine melo- 
dious voice. He is continuing his studies in 
Talmud at the Mir Yeshiva, and his secular studies 
at Brooklyn College. 

"Little drops of water, little grains of sand. 
Make the mighty ocean, and the pleasant land. 
Little deeds of kindness, little words of love. 
Help to make earth happy like the heaven 
above." — Fletcher 




HAROLD SGHEINMAN 

This member of the Williamsburg delegation 
gained fame in his Senior year in T.A. as editor 
of "The Star." Harold, one of the most popular 
members of his class, was also considered to be a 
"fine boy" by his French teacher. 



— 14 — 




ISAAC SHERMAN 

As G.O. Vice-President in his Senior year, Izie 
helped organize the Student Court and was a mem- 
ber of it in its first year. Now at Y.U. where he is 
a Sociology major, Izie aspires to be a lawyer. 

School was just another extra-curricular 
activity. 




DAVID SILBER 

The editor of that outstanding underground news- 
paper, "The Tabloid," Davy was a staunch defend- 
er of freedom of the press, even in the face of a 
certain English teacher, who ordered his "boys" to 
discontinue publication of this scandal sheet. Al- 
ways an ardent Zionist, David has fulfilled his 
dreams by going to Israel, where he is now study- 
ing. 

Whate'er he did was done with so much ease 

— Dry den 



GERALD TRAUB 

Gerald, the outcast in Brooklyn (a Yankee fan), 
was president of his class in his Senior year and 
Business Manager of the Elchanite. He is now a 
Pre-Med major at Y.U. and hopes to be one of 
the first graduates of the Yeshiva Medical School. 

Dr. Traub. I presume? 



— 15 



3' 



une. 



'52 



ELLIOTT ABERBAGH 



> 




Arista Vice leader 8; Arista Secretary 7; 
Student Court 7, 8; Class President 8; Class 
Secretary 6; Service Squad 7; Librarian 6; 
T.A. Publications 1, 2. 

Although Abbie had an affinity for coming late, 
he accomplished much in the few minutes he 
was present. An excellent student and well liked, 
he will continue (coming late) at Y.U. where he 
will major in Math. 

Abbie, Abbie, wherefore art thou, Abbie? 




LEON BERNSTEIN 

Art Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; T.A. Publica- 
tions Art Squad 1, 2; T.A. Publications typist 
6; Service Squad 7; Sanitation Manager 4, 5, 



The clown prince of our class, Leon glibly M.C.'d 
the school's first "Talent Night". His gift of 
comedy helped him make the teachers pass him. 
He plans to plague the profs at Y.U. with his 
barbed wit. 

All T.A. is a stage and Leon the STAR. 



LOUIS BERNSTEIN 

Service Squad 8; Sanitation Manager 7, 8; 
French Club 7. 

In his short time in T.A., Louis has proven to 
be a conscientious student. His forte is Mr. 
Bassell's economics class. Louis plans to major 
in History at Yeshiva. 

He is worth his weight in gold. 



16 — 




MARVIN BLAGKMAN 

Arista Leader 8; Arista 5, 6, 7, 8; G.O. Vice 
President 7; Student Court 7, 8; Associate 
editor-in-chief of the Elchanite 7, 8; Service 
Squad 7, 8; Class President 3, 5; Class Vice 
President 1; Class Debating Manager 4: 
Class Debating Team 1-8; School Debating 
Team 6, 7 , 8 ; Library Squad 1, 2. 

Marvin is tops in whatever he does. His talents 
run the gamut from an excellen;: student to an 
expert impersonator of an inebriate to a fine 
Talmud student. He expects to apply his talents 
at Y.U. 

He drinks deep at the bar of knowledge. 



SHELDON BLAGKMAN 

Arista 8; Head of Student Court 8; G.O. 
President 8; Inter-Yeshiva Council 8; Class 
President 7 ; Class Athletic Manager 4; Class 
Debating Team 1-8. 

Author of the autobiography "Mr. President", 
Sheldon is taking Dick Kazamier's place at 
Princeton where, in his spare time, he will study 
Psychology. He hopes to graduate in "Princeton 
Class of '56" (by hypnotizing his teachers). 

As president lie made quite a name. 
To graduate Princeton is his aim. 




JOSEPH BOOK 

Arista 8; Service Squad 7, 8; Class Secretary 
8; Class Debating Team 6J,8; G.O. Typing 
Squad 7,8; Book Squad 7; "STAR" reporter 
6; Elchanite Typing Squad S.6J.S. 

Joe is a little fellow who gets things done in j 
big way. Williamsburg can be proud of its am- 
bassador to T.A. who will shift his headquarters 
to Y.U. in the fall. 

.4 worthy edition to any school library. 



— 17 — 




ISAAC CHESIR 

Class Vice President 8; T.A. Publications 1, 
2; Class Sanitation Manager 3; Class De- 
hating Team 5. 

Isaac, who was twenty-percent of the French class, 
is "a fine boy" in Dr. Lichtenstein's estimation. 
He will follow in his father's footsteps and study 
engineering at City College. 

Hard work never killed anybody — 
Isaac isn't taking any chances. 



GERALD COHEN 

Arista 5-8; G.O. President 7 ; Student Court 
6-8; Class President 4, 6; Class Vice Presi- 
dent 2; Service Squad 2-6; Librarian 5; T.A. 
Publications 1, 2; Band Leader 8. 




Jerry, as one of the charter members of the bi- 
cycle brigade, blazed the trail to Central. During 
his tenure as G.O. President, he successfully ran 
T.A., though sometimes by remote control. He 
will study engineering. 

He learned much at the two high schools 
he attended. 




AARON DOBIN 

Service Squad 7 , 8 ; School Band 7, 8; Presi- 
dent of Band 8 ; Vice President of Band 7. 

Aaron is the "Les Paul" of T.A. This Brooklyn 
cowboy will settle in the wide open confines of 
Y.U., where he will use his musi il skill to aid 
him in becoming a doctor. 

He Strummed his way through English 
on his guitar. 




ISHAY DRAZIN 

Elchanite Typist 7, 8; G.O. Typina Squad 
7 ; Librarian 6; Sanitation Manager 3; Presi- 
dent of Radio Club 7. 

"Mount Sinai" Drazin plans to become a modern 
Moses by spanning the Red Sea with a bridge. 
He will pursue his engineering studies in the 
U.S. before going to Israel. 

A veritable engineering feat in himself. 




HERBERT DYM 

Arista 5-8; Vice-Leader of Arista 7; Class 
President 3; Class Secretary 2; Class De- 
bating Manager 5; Features and Activities 
Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; School Debating 
Team 5-8; Class Debating Team 3, 5, 7; 
Office Squad 3, 4 ; Service Squad 7, 8 ; School 
Basketball Team 4-8; Co-Captain of Bas- 
ketball Team 7, 8. 

"Modest" Herbie, who graduated with the coach- 
ing of his classmates and a ninety-six average, 
majored in basketball (in which he broke all 
records). He couldn't get into Yeshiva, so Herbie 
will continue his basketball career at Yale, where 
he will study engineering. 

With Mikan's skill and Einstein's knowledge, 
Herbie will find work easy in college. 

HERZL EISENSTADT 

T.A. Publications 1; Librarian 5, 7 ; Service 
Squad 8; Secretary-Treasurer of French 
Club 4; President of French Club 7, 8. 

One of the "fine learners" in Rabbi Yogel's class, 
Herzl will continue his Talmudic studies at Y.U. 
He was voted by the class as the man whose 
history notes were the hardest to copy. 



Better late than never — 
But better still never late 



Herd 
— Rabbi Zuroff. 



19 — 




MARTIN ELEFANT 

Service Squad 8; Office Squad 5; School 
Choir 1, 2. 

Marty's infectious laugh was appreciated by all 
save the teachers. His physique didn't deter him 
nor daunt his classmates. He expects to enjoy th° 
last laugh (his graduation) in the area of Y.U. 

Laugh and the world laughs with you. 



BERNARD ERLBAUM 

Arista 7, 8; Student Court 7, 8; Captain of 
Service Squad 8; Service Squad 6-8; Class 
President 7. 

Bernie is the "iron man" of the class, never hav- 
ing missed a single da)'. He is of that strange 
breed who claim not to know anything before 
a test but, when the marks are in, is strangely 
near or at the top. A swell guy, he is always 
giving a helping hand to anybody who needs it. 

Jack of all trades and master of most. 




STANLEY FISGHMAN 

Service Squad 4, 6; Class Vice President 4; 
Class Secretary 3; Class Debating Team 1- 
4; "Star" News Editor 7 ; T.A. Publications 
1,2. 

Stan successfully defended his constituents in 
Brighton Beach Bay from Mr. Lilker's baiting. 
Stan lists among his impersonations Mr. Landowne 
and John L. C. Sevony. Reluctantly, he'll give 
up acting to study medicine. 

We fell for him hook, line and sinker. 




IRWIN FOGEL 

Sanitation Matiager 4, 5; Radio Club 3-6; 
Music Club 7, 8. 

It took Irwin four years to discover a formula 
how to keep out of Mr. Lilker's hair. He comes 
to school so much by bike that it knows the 
way by itself. 



'Silence is deep as Eternity, 
Speech is shallow as Time 



— Carlyle 




BERNARD FREEDMAN 

Class Debating Manager 6; Class Debating 
Team 1-8; French Club 1-8. 

Bernie is one of the prize Talmudists of the class. 
A quiet fellow, he applies Talmudic logic in 
telling force whenever he debates. 

He argues long, he argues strong. 
His words he ne'er will stint. 
Would we had space beside his face, 
His arguments to print. 



AARON FREIMAN 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 8; Topics' Sports 
Staff 8; Manager of Basketball Team 8; 
Timekeeper 7; President of Tropical Fish 
Club 5. 

One of the more "active" students in Senor 
Cantor's Spanish class, Aaron enlivened our three 
vears there with his read\- wit. He will continue 
heckling teachers at Yeshivah University, where 
he will pre-med. 

Each season ended with a sigh. 
Wait 'till next year was Aaron's cry. 



21 



HAROLD FRIEDLANDER 

Arista 8; Class Debating Manager 7 ; School 
Debating Team 8; Class Debating Team 8; 
Library Squad 4-8. 

Harold, a recent acquisition from the Brighton 
Yeshiva, is one of the few boys who makes 
Rabbi Yogel's life in the morning bearable. An 
ardent Talmudist, he will continue his studies at 
Yeshiva. 

Reading maketh a full man. — Bacon 



AL FRIEDMAN 

Class Basketball Team 7, 8. 

Al, our expert on the Imagist movement, amazed 
Mr. Bassell with his fine term paper on the sub- 
ject. After finishing high school in three years, 
our Chaim Berlin transfer will attend Y.U. 

The transferee who took it easy. 



RICHARD GARBER 

Office Squad 8; Trainer of School Basket- 
ball Team 7, 8. 

Richie, a latecomer to our ranks, quickly became 
trainer of the T.A. Basketball Team. His chang- 
ing schools in midstream was a big advantage 
for us. 



Richard, thou healest all our wounds. 




EMANUEL GENN 

G.O. Vice-President 8 ; Inter School Council 
8; School Executive Council 8; Service 
Squad 6-8; Class Vice-President 7 ; Class 
Secretary 4; T.A. Publications 3, 4. 

Mr. Vice-President entered -school politics late in 
his school life and proved a "huge" success. 
Mendy's sense of humor tickled his classmates 
pink. He plans to settle law cases with his 
brawn if his tongue should fail him. 

Otte still strong man in a blatant school. 




SIDNEY GOLDSTEIN 

School Debating Manager 7; School Secre- 
tary Treasurer 8; School Debating Team 7, 
8; Kolenu Reporter 4; T.A. Publications 2; 
Class Debating Team 1-8. 

A very fine orator, Sidney spent many hours 
trying to get out of his difficulties with Mr. 
Lilker. He is acclaimed as the "Freshie's best 
friend". 

Whosoever would be a man must be a non- 
conformist. — Emerson 



RAPHAEL GOODMAN 

Class Vice-President 2; Service Squad >-7 ; 
Office Squad 1-7. 

Upon his graduation, Raphael will receive a de- 
gree in Office Management and Business Admini- 
stration in addition to his high school diploma. 
A staunch Bnei Akivanik, Ray intends to go to 
Israel some day. 

Ray was a good-man. 



— 23 





SAUL GREENFIELD 

Class President 5; Class Athletic Manager 
1; Service Squad ; President of Music Club. 

Athletic Saul, Boro-Park's gift to the fairer sex, 
amazed us all with his immeasurable contribution 
to the biology cause. With Mr. Lilker as his 
idol, he will major in History at Y.U. 

Shall I wasting in despair 

Die because a woman's fair. — Wither 



NORMAN GROSS 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 2, 3; Office Squad 
8 ; Library Squad 2. 

Good natured Normie is an ardent opera lover 
and always TRIES to solve the Times' crossword 
puzzles. He is one of the quietest and nicest 
fellows in the senior class, and he is going to 
attend Y.U. and study for the Rabbinate. 

Remember, better the world with a song. 

— Masefield 



JACOB HELLER 

Arista 8; Inter-School Council 8; Student 
Court 8; School Debating Manager 8; School 
Band 8; School Debating Team 7, 8; Class 
Debating Manager 3; Class Debating Team 
1, 2, 3, 7, 8; Office Squad 7. 

Yonk returned to his first love, T.A., after a 
short leave of absence. He proved his versatility 
by orating in the Journal American Oratory Con- 
test and producing and directing the school's first 
Talent Night on the same day. Yonk will follow 
in the footsteps of Henry Clay and will study 
law at Harvard or Columbia. 

Charm us, orator, till the lion looks no larger 

than the cat. 




ARNOLD HOFFMAN 

Service Squad 8; Class Debating Team 1, 3, 
6; Hebrew Club 1-4. 

Arnie is the Boswell of T.A. His anthology of 
history notes will be sent to the Library of Con- 
gress. He hopes to develop some new eye exer- 
cises for the nearsighted people at Y.U. 

Facts and figures! Put 'em down! — Dickens. 




SEYMOUR HOFFMAN 

Class Athletic Manager 3, 4; Class Sanita- 
tion Manager 1, 2, 5. 

The junior member of the brother combination 
of the class, Seymour is an all around athlete. 
When he becomes a Hebrew teacher, he vows not 
to pull the ears of students with roving eyes 
like Rabbi Faivelson does. 

Hoot man! Hoffman's near. 
He'll slam your back and flick your ear. 
And chalk your coat and all the while 
His face will wear a happy smile. 




JOSEPH KAHANE 

School Basketball Team 6; Radio Club 1-3; 
Science Club 4, 5. 

Joe is G-d's gift to T.A.'s faculty. Among other 
things, he is always accused of jeopardizing 
Rabbi Kanatopsky's job. A very sharp mathe- 
matician, Joe proved that somebody besides Mr. 
Heisler knows some Math. 

The Mathamaticiau has reached the highest rung 
on the ladder of human thought — Havelock Ellis 



— 25 






\ 



\. 



ALTER KEVELSON 

Class Sanitation Manager 1, 8; Founder of 
Tropical Fish Club — Vice-President 4, 5; 
Business Manager of Elchanite 7, 8; Office 
Squad 4, 5, 7, 8. 

All through his high school career Kevy thought 
that the teachers were conspiring against him. 
Altie fooled them all — he will graduate (with 
Mr. Strum's help) and major in money in later 
life. 

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may 
Old time is still a ff lying — Herrick 



I 



, 




HAROLD KIRSH 

Book Squad 7 ; Science Club 2, 3; Radio 
Club 5. 

Hesh is part of the triumvirate that includes 
Kahane and Wagshal. He has shown an under- 
lying talent in Talmud, to go along with his 
proficiency in his other studies. He will attend 
Y.U. in the fall. 

He easily disproves that good looks are only 
skin deep. 



JUDAH KLEIN 

School Debating Team 8; Class Debating 
Manager 8; Class Debating Team 2, 3, 4, 8; 
T.A. Topics — Feature Editor 8; Sports 
Editor 7 ; Staff Writer 4, 5; Service Squad 
4, 7; Library Staff 5, 7, 8; T.A. Publications 
2, 3. 

Judah majored in extra-curricular activities in 
school. An ardent debater and journalist, he 
will set up offices at Y.U. this fall. 

He never let education interfere with his 
schooling. 



— 26 




JONAH KUPIETZKY 

Service Squad 7 ; Office Squad 4-6; Co-Cap- 
tain of the School Basketball Team 7, 8; 
School Basketball Team 2-8; Class Athletic 
Manager 6. 

One of Rabbi Yogel's star pupils, "Long John" 
is no slouch in the afternoon either. Although 
he was put on the Yeshiva League First Team, 
he will concentrate on his Talmud studies at Y.U. 

A whale of a guy. 



MORTON KWESTEL 

Business Manager of the Elchanite 7, 8; 
Class Vice-President 5; Science Club 3-6. 

Morty is versatility personified. He ably patrolled 
shortstop every Lag B'Omer and excels in his 
science and math studies. This popular "Prophet" 
will major in science at Y.U. 

Always fresh and always sporty. 
Glad to crack his pleasant smile, 
A business genius is our Morty, 
Who will surely make his pile. 



JULIAN LANDAU 

Arista 7, 8; Student Court 7; Class Presi- 
dent 4; Class Debating Manager 2; School 
Debating Team 7, 8; Service Squad 5-8; 
Kolenu 7, 8; Feature Editor of Star 2-4; 
President of Zionist Club 7, 8; Class De- 
bating Team 1-8. 

Julie is unique in having the distinction of at- 
tending two schools at once. He claims it isn't 
his fault — his bike knows the way to Central 
by heart. A great lover of authority, he accepts 
all the Administration's decisions without question. 



Grow old along with me 
The best is vet to he. 





HERBERT LEIBOWITZ 

Arista Leader 7 ; Arista 6-8; G.O. Debating 
Manager 6; Features and Activities Editor 
of Elchanite 7, 8; Student Court 7, 8; Class 
Vice-President 4; Class Debating Manager 
1, 2, 5; Class Debating Team 1-8; "Star" 
News Editor 6; School Debating Team 6-8. 

Kibby, a real intellectual, has a secret desire to 
be a great orchestral conductor like Toscanini, 
but will have to settle for a Nobel Prize in 
literature. An ardent but discriminating opera 
fan, he plans to grace the publications of Y.U. 
with his talents. 

He is a scholar, and a ripe good one. 
fair spoken and persuading. 

ELLIOT LEVINE 

Arista 8; Class Vice-President 7 ; Class Sec- 
retary-Treasurer 4; Class Athletic Manager 
5 ; Class Librarian 1, 2; Service Squad 7, 8; 
Library Squad 7, 8; Class Debating Team 
3, 4; President of Music Club 7. 

Elliot (Muscles) Levine, a prominent weight 
lifter, was forced to abandon his avocation when, 
while pressing 3,000 pounds, he fell through the 
floor. Elliot's secret method for developing wrists 
and fingers is jotting down verbatim Mr. Lilker's 
pearls of wisdom. He will attend Y.U. 
Irresistible Elliot? Whom unarmed 
No strength of man or fiercest wild beast 
could withstand. — Stolen partly from Milton. 



IRWIN MILLER 

School Basketball Team 5-8; Science Club 
7, 8. 

"Jack" transfered from Toras Chaim and soon 
cracked the T.A. varsity with his deadly set shot. 
A very friendly fellow, he'll take his jump shot 
to Yeshivah University. 

Jack be nimble, Jack be quick. 

Jack jumped up and his guard looked sick. 



— 28 




IRWIN NATHAN 

Class Vice-President 3; Class Sanitation 
Manager 2, 5, 7; Librarian 5-8; Office Squad 
5-7 ; Library Typing Squad 6. 

Irwin did his work quietly and well during his 
high school career. His classmates recognized his 
value and elected him to numerous offices. He 
will continue his fine work at Y.U., where he 
hopes to become a teacher. 

Worth makes the man. — Pope 



BERNARD NEMERSON 

School Athletic Manager 7; Class President 
5; Class Athletic Manager 5; Service Squad 
8; Art Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; Typing 
Squad 8; School Basketball Team 7, 8. 

Bernie persuaded Rabbi Zuroff that he was going 
to Brooklyn College not for the girls but in 
order to take R.O.T.C. (Rabbinical Orthodox 
Training Corps). He will major in basketball at 
B.C. and dabble in history in his spare moments. 

Art is long and time is fleeting. 




HAROLD NEUSTADTER 

Class Vice-President ; Business Manager of 
Elchanite 7, 8; Class Debating Team; T.A. 
Publications. 

Although he is one of the youngest boys in our 
class, Harold is also one of the most intelligent. 
He will attend Y.U. and become a Math major 
but someone better tell him that you have to do 
your homework. 

// a man's icit he icandering, 

let him study ituithcmatics. — Bacon 



29 





\j^. 




AVROM REICHMAN 

Service Squad 6, 7; Class Vice-President 6; 
Class Debating Team 4; Librarian 3; Office 
Squad 3-S; Basketball Team Manager 5. 

Avy, a staunch Bnei Akivanik, wishes that the 
day had thirty hours, so he could do all the 
things on his crowded agenda. A real ladies' 
man, he plans to be a bachelor of law. 

Eastward ho! To the land of the Mogen Dovid. 



BERNARD ROSENBAUM 

Class Debating Team 3, 4; Class Basketball 
Team 1-8; Public Speaking Club. 

Benny, a dangerous man to meddle with, as Mr. 
Allan found out, showed his mettle in the Eco. 
class, where he taught Mr. Bassell merchandising. 
He will continue getting a liberal education 
Saturday nights while attending N.Y.U. 

Then be not coy, but use your time 
And while ye may go marry. 




STANLEY ROSENBERG 

Class President 2; Arista 7, 8; Class Vice- 
President; Class Athletic Manager 5; Sports 
Editor of Topics 5; Class Debating Team 
1-8; School Basketball Team 7, 8. 

Stanley monopolized Mr. Bassell's Eco. class with 
questions on what he deemed were "fundamental" 
points — i.e. "What's Madeleine Carroll's tele- 
phone number". He will continue asking ques- 
tions at Yeshiva, where he intends to prepare 
for law school. 

Force is of brutes, but honor is of man. 

— John Dryden 



30 — 




JOSEPH ROTENBERG 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 6; Service Squad 
6-8; Class Librarian 4. 

Joe, who is the marbles champion of Kelly Park, 
took boxing lessons from Battlin' Bob. What's 
he going to do when Rosenberg, his sparring 
partner, leaves him? Joe can see cubes whirling 
in front of his eyes; he's not punchdrunk, he's 
taking engineering at City (what an exam!). 
His ambition is to become Mr. Epstein's caddy. 

He is quiet but ah me 

What a world of thoughts there be 

In the recess of his brain 

Safe from mortal's prying eyes. 



MOSES SALEM 

Service Squad S; Class Secretary 8; Li- 
brarian 6; Hebrew Club President 5. 

Moe was born to be an actor. He was the per- 
fect foil for Mr. Godin and kept his French 6 
classmates in stitches until the Regents. Rumor 
has it that Hollywood talent scouts are hot on 
his trail. 

Our contribution to 'Fractured French'. 




JOEL SGHECTER 

Service Squad 5, 8; Class President 1; Office 
Squad 8. 

Joe has traveled much in his time. His subtle 
sense of humor is best appreciated by the denizens 
of T.A. He plans to travel to India where he 
hopes to be a soil conservationist, after taking 
his B.S. at Y.U. 

Laugh and Joel laughs with you. 

Frown and he'll smile at you, too 
For he believes that a smile can dccDniplish, 

What never a frown can do. 



— 31 



MARSHALL SGHLESINGER 

Class Athletic Manager 7 ; Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 3; Library Squad 5, 7 ; Office 
Squad S, 8; President of Tropical Fish Club. 

An ardent tropical fish fancier, Marshall boasts 
of a collection of three Georgeous Glittering 
Golden Guppies. The Beau Brommell of T.A., 
his ideal is to be a curator of an aquarium. 

Marshall dressed in all his trim. 

Hath put a spirit of youth on everything 

— Shakespeare 




LOUIS SCHNEIDER 

Arista 8; Service Squad 7, 8; Class Vice- 
President 8; Class Secretary 5; Class Ath- 
letic Manager 7 ; Librarian 8. 

Louis is known for his conscientiousness. He 
puts his heart into whatever he does, be it Math 
or Basketball. He is like a cactus, rough on the 
outside, but good within. 

Much fruit of sense beneath is readily found. 





CHARLES SCHWARTZ 

Office Squad 6, 7 ; School Basketball Team 
7, 8; J.V. Basketball Team 5, 6. 

Charlie, a great basketball and baseball player 
(if you don't believe it just ask him) aided our 
class greatly in intramural athletics. "Tex" 
Schviartz's subtle wit kept us amused for three 
and one-half years. 

Don't fence him in. 



— 32 





ALAN J. SEELENFREUND 

Business Manager Elclianite 7, H; Class Ath- 
letic Manager 1, 2, 5; School Basketball 
Team 7, 8. 

Jerry is one of the most popular boys in the 
class. He always has a good word for everybody 
(including teachers). An all around guy, he plans 
to crack the Ivy League this fall at Wharton. 

As steady as the Rock of Gibraltar. 



JACOB SILVERMAN 

Arista 8; Class Vice-President 6; Class Sec- 
retary-Treasurer S; Class Athletic Manager 
8; G.O. Newspaper 4, 5, 7; Sports Editor of 
Topics 8; Class Debating Team 2, 3, 5. 6, 8. 

In his last term, Jackie defended his viewpoint 
that Yeshiva students were trustworthy, with 
stolid perseverance. A favorite in history, he 
lowered himself long enough to win the history 
contest of the Hearst papers, even though he 
disagreed with their policies. 

His jokes are cutting, raw 

and devilish artistic 
Another George B. Shaw 

and just as pessimistic. 



SEYMOUR STEINMETZ 

Service Squad 7 ; Class Secretary 7 ; Class 
Debating Team 7. 

Se)mour arrived in our school from Israel by 
way of R.J.J. He finally came to the end of the 
road, when he came to T.A. The answer to 
Rabbi Faivelson's dreams, Seymour plans to at- 
tend Y.U. in the fall for his studies before be- 
coming a doctor. 



A mind triumph: 



:r iiuniv matters. 



— 33 




MORRIS STILLMAN 

Photography Editor of Elchanite 7, 8 ; Science 
Club 7. 

Morris is a versatile fellow, with his photography, 
magic, and body building. He's also quite a hard- 
ball pitcher ??? Upon his graduation, Morris will 
receive along with his regular diploma a M.W.L. 
(Master of Weight Lifting) 

Magician, make those teachers disappear. 



JOSHUA TEITELBAUM 

Editor-in-Chief of Elchanite 7, 8; Arista 8; 
Class Debating Team 7, 8. 

Josh fell asleep at the entrance exam and has 
slept through three and one-half years at T.A., 
but he seems to wake up for the Regents, in 
which he gets lOO's. He contends that he does 
it by luck. In addition to his scholastic attain- 
ments, Josh is the most feared if not the best 
basketball player in T.A. 

Ha, Ha, what a brain 

Ho, Ho, what a brow 

The editor's before you now. 

And Horace Greely envy's slave 

Doth turn within his narrow grave. 



SAMUEL WAGSHAL 

Office Squad 5-7; School Choir 1, 2; Class 
Secretary 2; Sanitation Manager 7. 

Sammy, our school Spaniard, really kept us laugh- 
ing for four years with his sense of humor. He 
intends to continue at Y.U. where he wiU study 
for the Rabbinate. 

Act well your part, there all the honor lies. 

— Alexander Pope. 



— 34 — 




MARTIN WUNDERLICH 

Service Squad 5-7 ; Office Squad 4-8; Book 
Squad 4-8. 

Marty is indispensable to his class and to the 
office. Without him it is doubtful if Mrs. Leviton 
could run the office or eat. He has done bis 
share for the class by getting us all the inside 
information beforehand. He is going to Rutgers 
where he will major in Agriculture prior to 
applying his knowledge in Israel. 

They also serve who only stand and wait. 

— Milton 




STANLEY ZAHNER 

School Basketball Team 5-8; Class Athletic 
Manager 8. 

Despite the fact that he arrived a bit too late, 
Stan tried to set a record for "most times at 
Central". Alas! He joined the bicycle brigade 
too late. He will be cycling up and down the 
hills near Y.U. in the fall. 

The swiftest traveler is he that goes afoot. 

— Thoreau 



MELVIN ZELEFSKY 

Arista 7, 8; Service Squad 7; Photography 
Editor Elchanite 7, 8; Class Debating Man- 
ager 7, 8; Class Debating Team 1-8. 

Melvin is the "Masmid" of the class. He is the 

inventor of a new wind instrument his hands, 

with which he plays a musical tune for the en- 
tertainment of his classmates. Melvin will mi- 
grate to Y.U. for his Talmud studies. 

Nice guys finish last. 



35 



A Hill OF FAME 



V 



Y 



Best Dressed — Judah Klein, Louis Schneider 

Best Matured — Elliott Aberbach, Joseph Rotenberg 

Class Actor — Moses Salem 

Class Artists — Leon Bernstein, Bernard Nemerson 

Class Athletes — Saul Greenfield, Jonah Kupietzky 

Class Basketball Star — Irwin Miller 

Class Businessmen — Martin Elefant, Harold Neustadter 

Class Casanovas — Bernard Rosenbaum, Stanley Zahner 

Class Comedians ■ — Alter Kevelson, Sainuel Wagshal 

Class Dreamer — Norman Gross 

Class Hebraist — Seymour Steinmetz 

Class Historian — Herbert Leibowitz 

Class Idealist — Julian Landau 

Class Journalist — ■ Arnold Hoffman 

Class Mathematician — Joseph Kahane 

Class Mechanics — Ishay Drazin, Irwin Fogel 

Class Musician — Aaron Dobin 

Class Orator — Jacob Heller 

Class Poet — Joseph Book 

Class Politician — Emanuel Genn 

Class Talmudists — Harold Friedlander, Melvin Zelefsky 

Class Thinkers — Bernard Freedman, Joshua Teitelbaum 

Class Zionists — Raphael Goodman, Avrom Reichman 

Did Most For School — Gerald Cohen, Sidney Goldstein 

Friendliest — Stanley Fischman 

Handsomest — Harold Kirsch, Elliott Levine 

Most Ambitious — Al Freedman, Herzl Eisenstadt 

Most Cheerful — ^ Aaron Freiman, Seymour Hoffman 

Most Conscientious — Louis Bernstein 

Most Courteous — Marshall Schlesinger 

Most Dignified — Elliot Spar 

Most Intelligent — Marvin Blackman, Herbert Dym 

Most Likely to Succeed — Bernard Erlbaum, Jacob Silverman 

Most Pleasant — Richard Garber 

Most Popular — Sheldon Blackman, Morton Kwestel 

Most Versatile — Stanley Rosenberg, Alan J. Seelenfreund 

Quietest — • Joel Schechter 



— 36 — 



<^ 



^e#**^ 



fi^lAd^ 





t^iatif 



ENTRANCE EXAM. 

Soph reads off answers . . . Josh gets bored 
and falls asleep . . . Everybody passes. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

We come to T.A. . . . They took one look at 
our faces and sent us home for another week . . . 
The class is filled with towering giants . . . 4'11". 
Teitelbaum expresses opinion of school in Landau's 
sailor hat . . . Leon fails his first French test, but 
is consoled by the good will of the teacher . . . One 
subjea we all enjoy is music. All we do is listen 
to records. Oops, our mistake, here come the notes. 
But Mr. Grossman, they're all dead . . . Charlie 
Friedman helps school park his car . . . Bob Bassell 
teaches Physics in Civics . . . Jerry goes to the 
bathroom and returns with his coat . . . How did 
Mart}' ever find out? . . . There's one Rabbi teach- 
ing baseball and Talmud. How does he know what 
happened in 1919? He wasn't even born then . . . 
Mr. Turetsky forgets to give homework . . . Finals. 
Mr. Lilker changes the Civics final a half hour 
before the test begins . . . Poor Max . . . Rabbi 
Berenholtz starts an appeal for the Yeshivah of 
Baltimore. One Sunday morning we walk into 
Rabbi Berenholtz's class but he is nowhere to be 
found. We are about to leave when a squeaky 
voice from nowhere yells STOP! Or else jou'll 
get zeroes on your record. It was he of the tribe 
of the Chipaways Chic Chic Chickanowitz. Students' 
Day . . . Kahane takes over Science and Mr. Fried- 
man starts to ad lib from the back of the room 
. . . Mr. Friedman exempts more than half the class 
in Science and Math. He explains his system . . . 



The boys' cards landing nearest the walls are the 
lucky ones . . . 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Rabbi Herskovics teaches us Hebrew . . . Gooody. 
Too bad we all don't come from Flatbush . . . 
Math II . . . New teacher . . . We learn astronomical 
figures . . . Newsie gets fallen arches from standing 
in the corner . . . Test average 34% . . . We play 
follow the leader with Mr. Landowne looking for 
a room that blows fresh snow into our faces. Julie 
gives a surprise test and half the class fails . . . 
Julie stops in the middle of a sentence and picks 
up where he left off the next day . . . Dr. Lichten- 
stein gives no homework . . . just extra credeet . . . 
Our class basketball team pulls a stunning upset by 
defeating Elihu Levine and Co. ... At the Lag 
B'omer outing. Doc refuses to leave second when 
the Rabbi asks him, on the grounds that he was 
there first . . . Mr. Bassell tells us of Mme. De 
Maupin . . . Guess whose face turned red? . . . 
We start Geometr) . . . Mr. Turetsk)- warns us 
that the foist thing you have to loin is to do your 
homework . . . We win Students' Day again with 
our own song "We have a school and a half" . . . 
Rabbi Herskovics gets tough. "You will all make 
finals" P.S. everyone exempt . . . Spanish Regents 
just around the corner . . . After seven month re- 
minder Altie forgets . . . Greeny sorry he didn't 
take French . . . WOW ! what a proctor ! . . . 
"Who concentrated on his regents paper . . . We 
get scared when Senor isn't on time for dictation 
. . . New candy store man . . . Bert . . . Assisted 
by Helen of Troy, he gives us service with a 
smile ? ? 




hiatif 



JUNIOR YEAR 

We get a new Hebrew teacher . . . He has a 
monopoly on the map business ... 50 map only 
35(? . . . Rabbi Faivelson returns from Israel with 
specimens of rock from the Jordan . . . Marvin 
goes into competition with Faivy by bringing his 
own rocks . . . from his own backyard . . . We 
meet that lovable character "David Copperfield". 
Another new subject . . . Zeroes with a smile . . . 
A new English teacher . . . Newsie back in the 
corner . . . Mr. Godin teaches the French class in 
technicolor . . . Salem disappointed in French postal 
cards brought to class . . . Student wins math con- 
test . . . One right . . . What a brain ! T.A.'s 
getting crowded ... I wonder why . . . Dr. Saphire 
gives us the honor and privilege of going to summer 
school . . . We see what a real school looks like 
. . . Landau complains about not being able to 
touch the English teacher . . . The trip to the U.N. 
ends up in the Paramount (That's My Boy) 

SENIOR YEAR 

Jerry finally joins the T.A. team by popular de- 
mand . . . Mr. Lilker gives us his new theory on 
education . ..The whole class stays up all night 
reviewing the day's work . . . Aaron returns to 
school to play the guitar for Mr. Strum . . . Mr. 



.English 
. Long- 




Heisler teaches Calculus in two days . . . He memo- 
rizes the log chart . . . Kahane has a slight disa- 
greement with him . . . Central moves . . . Direc- 
tional controls on bikes adjusted . . . Mr. Strum: 
Spar, read Spartacus. 

Spar: Spartacus? 

Mr. Strum: No, Spartacus. 

Summer ends . . . Back to the dumps . 
course.' This is American Literature? . 
fellow was a short man . . . True or False.'?.'? . . . 
Another Spanish regents around the corner . . . 
Take me out to the ball game . . . Who whistled? 
. . . Mr. Strum reveals to us a booming baritone 
voice and Ben Johnson turns over in his grave 
(Poor Celia) . . . New course. Economics . . . 
The room gets hot as Kevelson keeps on talking 
. . . Leon hits homer into Ebbets field . . . Baseball 
scouts follow him around . . . Seniors win Basket- 
ball tournament . . . What happened to the trophy? 
. . . Seniors run away with Lag B'Omer outing . . . 
still no trophy! . . . Here we are at Regents 
Scholarships . . . How do you get from Plattsburg 
to Oswego as the crow flies? . . . Fifty transporta- 
tion cards reported missing from the office . . . 
Seventy-five turn up . . . Seymour Hoffman startles 
the class with his dramatic reading of poetry . . . 
Regents are here . . . How did we pass? . . . Well 
here we are on Graduation . . . Never thought we 
would finish . . . Goodby to dear teachers and 
friends . . . Hello to new teachers . . . starting a new 
page in our lives and hoping it will be as enjoyable 
and profitable as our years in T.A. . . . 







' s^ 




^ talent Ccutt 



Mr. Strum — Faculty Adviser 

The Student Court, the judiciary branch of the CO., is composed of six 
members chosen from Arista. Violators of school ordinances are brought before 
the court, with a report filed by the Service Squad as evidence. During the past 
year the defendant has been given the opportunity to retain a lawyer. Mr. Strum, 
the Faculty Adviser, believes in socially improving students who are found guilty. 



JUSTICE IN ACTION 

From left to right: Morton Kwestel, Marvin Blackman, Herbert Leibowitz, 
Bernard Erlbaum, Elliot Aberbach, Julian Landau, Gerald Cohen. 




From left to right: 

Philip Felig, Mr. Strum, 

Gerald Cohen, Marvin Blackman. 



Fall Term: 

Gerald Cohen — President 
Marvin Blackman — Vice-President 
Philip Felig — Secretary-Treasurer 




From left to right : 

Emanuel Genn, Sidney Goldstein, 

Sheldon Blackman 



The diversified activities of the school are 
integrated with the work of the G.O. The 
G.O. in the fall term organized the school 
band which has become an outstanding extra- 
curricular activity. The annual Chanukah 
"Chagiga" was a rousing success. The ar- 
ranged program was interesting and well 
organized. 

In the spring, a new slate of officers was 
elected. A new idea of having an Amateur 
Nitc with the talent recruited from the stu- 
dents themselves was put forth. Again the 
attraction was successful due to the tireless 
efforts of the officers. Special credit is due 
to Jacob Heller, who produced and directed 
the show. An Inter-Yeshivah Council was 
set up to deal with the joint problems of the 
three high schools of Yeshivah University. 





^HMa 



As in the past, Arista has stretched out its helping hand to aid the weaker 
students. Student Court judges are chosen from the ranks of Arista. It was 
through the efforts of Arista that an auditorium was obtained for the use of 
the school for Amateur Nite. Plans for a literary magazine are being drawn up. 




From left to right : 

Herbert D)m, Herbert Leibowitz, 

Mr. Lebowitz, Elliot Aberbach 



Fall Term — Leader : Herbert Leibowitz 
Vice Leader — Herbert Dym 
Secretary — Elliott Aberbach 

Spring Term — Leader; Marvin Blackman 
Vice Leader — Elliott Aberbach 
Secretary — Joseph Silverstein 

Faculty Adviser — Mr. Samuel Lebowitz 





Sidney Goldstein — Debating Manager — Fall Term 
Jacob Heller — Debating Manager — Spring Term 



The Debating Society has control o-ser inter-school and intramural debating 
in T.A. An innovation introduced by the Debating Ivlanagers this year was a 
new scoring system which emphasized a scientific approach to judging. This 
brought a uniformitj' in scoring which was lacking heretofore. Since debating 
entails a large amount of historical knowledge, many debates were shifted to 
the histot)' period. 

In intramural debating, there were two leagues in which each class par- 
ticipated in five debates. The leaders of both leagues then clashed during a 
special assembly, and medals were awarded to the winning team. 

There was also an extensive program of inter-school debating in which 
T.A. achieved an impressive record. 




1 



Debating 

Jacob Heller Orating 



hel^atin^ ^cdetif 



f5 




^etiDice ^qua4 



Bernard Erlbaum — Captain 



The Service Squad members are everywhere. They patrol the halls, the gym, 
the library and the grounds of the school, maintaining order and keeping the 
school clean. They are a conscientious group which gets little thanks for a job 
well done. 

This past term a precedent was set when the G.O. elected a captain of the 
Service Squad. His job was to supervise the work of the squadsmen with an 
eye for greater efficiency. Bernard Erlbaum, our captain, performed his job 
admirably well. 




The Service Squad /n Acfion 

(A future case of the 
Student Court) 




Xil^Mttf 



Rabbi Joseph D. Epstein — Librarian, Hebrew Library. 
Mr. Abraham Lebowitz — Librarian, English Library. 



A good library is an asset to any school. It is of invaluable assistance to 
the student who has to do ex:ra research. A library must match strides with the 
growth of its student body and we can be proud of our library for it has done 
so. A steady stream of new material reaches the library daily. The latest peri- 
odicals are on file for the student's use. Mr. Lebowitz has done a splendid job 
in amassing new material and in completely reorganizing and sys:ematizing the 
library. 

This year has seen the addition of a new branch to our library. Through 
the efforts of many charitable people, a library especially devoted to Hebrew 
culture and literature has been set up. Under the direction of the noted scholar. 
Rabbi Joseph D. Epstein, the library has steadily increased its facilities. The 
library received an impetus with the asquisition of the personal library of Rabbi 
Bernard Leventhal, Chief Rabbi of Philadelphia. It consists of over two thousand 
volumes. 




Left to Right: 
Nahum Gordon, 
Herbert Rothman, 
Jacob Lebowitz 




Left to right: 
Louis Schneider, 
Philip Fleischer 



^chccl Sand 



Elliott Spar and Gerald Cohen — Conductors 



Whenever the idea of having a school 
band was brought up it was always laughed 
at. Last September a group of young men 
decided to take matters into its own hands 
and make the band a reality. The sneers 
and jeers of the students could be heard 
when the band practiced but the side remarks 
only made its members more determined to 
succeed. And succeed they did. Their debut 
took place at a school assembly and was very 
successful. The individual members parti- 
cipated in Talent Nite. 




7 /^. Pul^licati0H^ 



KOLENU 

Rabbi Faivelson — Faculty Adviser 

Kolenu is one of the few literary magazines in the country written entirely 
in Hebrew by students of High School level. This year's issue, like its predecessors, 
contains many articles of lasting value. 

T.A. TOPICS 

Melvin Adler — Editor 

Mr. Sidney Gold — Faculty Adviser 

The newest addition to the list of T.A. Publications is T.A. Topics. Spon- 
sored by the CO., the staff is recruited from the ranks of the Journalism Club. 
The object of the paper is to keep the students well informed of all activities 
going on during and after school. A special section devoted to humor is included. 



Left to right: Judah Klein, Melvin Adler, Jacob Silverman, Philip Felig 




Mletia 



Bernard Nemerion — Athletic Manager: Fall Term 

Barry Hochdorf — Athletic Manager : Spring Term. 

Jonah Kupietzky, Herbert Dym — Co-Captain of Basketball Team 

Hal Jetter — Basketball Coach 

This past year has seen the emergence of a Yeshiva High 
School Basketball League from the planning stage to a reality. The 
League is sponsored by the Yeshiva University Athletic Association. 
This league consists of Chaim Berlin, T. A. Uptown, R.J. J., M.T.V., 
Ramaz, and Brooklyn T.A. Our basketball team, ably coached by 
Hal Jetter, wound up third. In one game Herbert Dym broke the 
previous record for most points scored in one game with a 35 
point total. Dym also set a new record for most points scored in 
one season. 

There is also an extensive program of intra-mural athletics 
which was organized by Bernie Nemerson and Barry Hochdorf. 
There were tournaments in basketball, punchball, baseball, ping- 
pong and foul shooting. 

As usual, our athletic program was completed with the annual 
Lag B'Omer outing. The events at the outing included a variety 
of competitions in track and field, Softball and soccer. The school 
Softball championship was won by Class 8B. 



•;/ 



/ 



ODE TO ISRAEL 



?,y ALAN SCHER 



y 



V 



Oh land so young 
So brave, so free, 
To you, my wandering 
Thoughts do flee. 
I want to work. 
To live, to be, 
Near you Oh Israel, 
So near to thee. 



Abraham, Moses, 
David, Saul. 
A history of Israel's 
Rise and fall. 
And now, by work. 
And sweat and toil. 
They sow and reap 
That ancient soil. 



CTd 



\^ 



Her past and present 
All may see. 
I pray her future 
Thus, may be; 
A people strong. 
And kind and free. 
Oh land of Israel, 
I love but thee. 



58 — 



Survival In The Forest 



I 



am of Jewish descent. My home, prior to World 
War II, was Poland, that agricultural country to the 
northeast of Germany, which has been continually 
brow-beaten by its always powerful neighbors. This 
time, it was the German Wehrmacht, spearheaded 
by Panzer divisions, that took but two weeks to 
conquer a feebly resisting Poland. Prior to this. 
Eastern Poland had been in Russian hands, and 
Western Poland in German hands. Those Jews in 
German hands were herded into ghettos, to be sent 
to concentration camps later, while those Jews in 
Russian territory were sent to Siberia. Faced with 
no other alternative, many Jews were forced to es- 
cape the confines of civilization, and find refuge in 
the all-concealing forests. However, it was not long 
before Germany was in complete control of the 
whole country. 

Not only Jews, but many other Poles had escaped 
to the wilderness, among them former soldiers in 
the Polish army, equipped with various arms. These 
partisans were a troublesome thorn in the hide of 
the Nazis. However, in this case misery did not 
love company, and, shunned by the Polish patriots, 
the Jews were forced to fend for themselves. They 
broke up into small groups, and spread throughout 
the hinterlands, surviving as best they could. 

In an isolated spot in the northern confines of 
the forest, I found myself among some fifty others. 
We hastily counseled, and decided to form a band, 
remaining together for the duration of hostilities. 
My brother Simcha, thirty years old, handsome, and 
a fair marksman, was chosen for the latter attribute 
mainly, as our leader. I was then twenty-five years 
old, somewhat of a marksman along my brother's 
lines. I was therefore appointed to assist him in 
the protection of our improvised community. As 
our first plan, we decided to construct an under- 
ground bunker. All of us would work on the 
building, except my brother and I, who would scout 
out from the camp to watch for disturbances. 

The building of the bunker, which occupied our 
attention continuously, was no easy task, especially 



Editor's Note: Tints is a true account of experiences 
liad by a friend of the author, as told to the author. 



By MOSES SILBERBERG 

so since we hadn't even a hammer, hatchet or spade 
among us. We had escaped as one flees from a 
fire, and had had no opportunity to rescue imple- 
ments of any kind. As a substitute we sharpened 
stray tree branches, and with these began to dig. 

As the people were comparatively settled, my 
brother and I skirted the edge of the wilderness to 
observe what was occurring outside of our shelter. 
We came upon a railroad embankment. There a 
train would pass every hour. More impressive than 
this symbol of civilization, was the seemingly stately 
figure of a German soldier standing guard, complete 
with rifle, pistol and ammunition belt. We instantly 
realized that this equipment would be a great boon 
to our limited resources. Inching forward on our 
stomachs, we approached our quarry. Within nine 
feet of success we were spotted. As the soldier cried 




out, my brother and I attacked him. A shot rang 
out and I felt a sharp pain in my left arm, but I 
couldn't allow myself the luxury of worrying about 
it. My fist pushed into his belly, while my brother 
clubbed him on the head. 

After a few minutes the man appeared lifeless. 
We tied him up and left him on the railroad tracks. 
Sick with exhaustion and nervousness, we returned 
to our camp, carrying with us the soldier's arms 
and equipment. We were not nervous for fear of 
the Germans, for we knew that they would never 
comb the sniper-infested wilds, merely to avenge the 
death of an unimportant sentry. What worried us 
was that we had killed a human being. We solaced 
ourselves with the thought that the arms would 
be necessary for the survival of many people. 

Simcha realized that the immediate problem was 
one of provisions. The completion of the bunker 
would come later. My brother and I, together with 
two others prepared for the expedition. Simcha 
holding the pistol, and I the rifle, we left the en- 
campment late one night and approached the near- 
est homestead. We had hoped to take the neces- 
sary supplies quietly, but such was not our lot. A 
barking dog emerged from the shadows, and I was 
forced to silence him with my knife. The entire 
household, awakened from their sleep, and quite 
bewildered, rushed to the main room, where we 
stood with drawn guns. We explained that we 
were partisans, in need of provisions. We warned 
them not to contact the Germans, for should they 
do so, they would not live through the night. Tak- 
ing along as much as we could carry, including 
some tools to assist us in the construction of our 
bunker, we left by a roundabout route, so as not 
to indicate the direction to our hideway. 

For six months we worked on the construction of 
the bunker. The work progressed during the winter 
months, but until the bunker's completion we had 
no protection from the elements. We dug holes in 
the snow, and rested there. To our great sorrow, 
many of us could not survive the double dose of 
building and weather. By the time the blessed 
spring had thawed us out, only forty-three of the 
original fifty-two had survived. 

A system for protection and survival was set up. 
Three different youths were sent out every day to 
obtain provisions, by any means fair or foul. Two 



others followed at a distance, ready to defend the 
three should they be ambushed. Another three per- 
sons were set up on perches on trees near the out- 
lying section of the camp, to watch for approaching 
danger. 

We never had enough arms. Once, when my 
brother and I, dressed as farmers, were walking 
outside the confines of the forest, a motorcycle 
policeman approached and asked for our passports. 
Feigning to search for his identification, my brother 
whipped out his revolver, while I disarmed the 
policeman, who was too pre-occupied with my 
brother to notice me. We stripped the dead driver 
and placed him near his motorcycle, which we had 
wrecked, under a nearby tree. 

Another time a look-out came running with the 
news that a German soldier was nearing our area. 
Silently, Simcha stole out the back entrance, climbed 
a tree, and observed a German soldier trailing one 
of our group who was carrying a load of provisions. 
Acting instantly, Simcha jumped down from his 
place, calling: "Hands up!" as he dropped. The 
German raised his hands, and we escorted him to 
our bunker. He confirmed our hope that he was 
alone, merely following an unknown person who 
had stolen a loaf of bread. 

Thus we existed until 1943. During the month of 
May, of that year, we met ten other Jews who had 
been living our kind of life for the past year. How- 
ever, they had been befriended by a farmer, who 
kept them well supplied with food and ammunition, 
and who, we later discovered, was only too happy 
to assist us also. His hate for the Germans was 
unquenchable, as his only son had been killed fight- 
ing them while in the service of the Polish army. 
Upon one memorable instance, he and my brother, 
both of whom were attired in German uniforms 
stripped from the Feuhrer's "own" on various ven- 
tures, left on an important mission. Their guise as 
Germans helped greatly as they removed a large sup- 
ply of dynamite from a nearby arsenal. Through the 
help of this ammunition, we were later able to blow 
up a supply train as it passed the stretch of track 
near the forest. Such was our life until the defeat 
of the Third Reich. 

Now, as I reminisce over my experiences, I real- 
ize that our long and hard fight to keep Poland 
free for Jewry was in vain. This holocaust and the 



— 60 



ensuing victory in no way improved the position of 
my people. Many of my fellow Jews, who after 
surviving the tortures of Nazism, came home hoping 
for peace, were killed by their Polish neighbors 
upon their return. There is a solution, however, 
which has materialized in more miraculous a form 



than any adventure which befell me. There is now 
a national home for the Jew, where he may live 
freely. There I live at present. At last I have 
found a resting place! I now give happily of my 
time and energy, for I know that I build for an 
eternal future. 



Fear 



By MELVIN ZELEFSKY 



Have you ever wandered through 

A graveyard dark and dreary? 
On a midnight damp with dew 

■With willows hanging limp and weary.'' 

When the owl's screams send shivers 

running up your spine 
Sets your mind to thinking of the 

goblins on the vine 
When the faraway hounds howling 

at the moon 
Sets your heart apounding to the 

laughing of the loon. 

Yes fear has such an amazing might 
The strongest of men are afraid; 

To them the shadows of the moonlit night 
Appear like demons on parade. 

Yet that reverent man so kind and old 
None would think him brave nor bold 

Past the graveyard onward he would plod 
He has no fear except the fear of G-d. 




61 



SYRIAN JEWRY 



By MARVIN BLACKMAN 



h 



.N 1908 New York's lower East-side witnessed 
the coming of a new people to its already well 
crowded section. The tinge in the new neighbor's 
face was of a darker hue than that of the customary 
immigrant. The customs and fashions which the 
newcomer brought along differed from the al- 
ready well established practices of East-side Jewry. 
But then there was a reason for all these contrasts 
to the well formulated practices. Here was a dif- 
ferent type of Jew who had had no contact with his 
Ashkenazic brother for hundreds of years. This new 
member was the Syrian Jew. 

The sudden immigration had its roots in the 
Young Turks' Revolution. The program of the 
Young Turks in the modernization of the Near East 
consisted of economic, racial, and religious tenets 
that conflicted strongly with those of the Syrian 
Jews. Instead of remaining to be guinea pigs to the 
numerous persecutions inflicted on them, they left 
quickly. They fled from their native towns of Alep- 
po, Damascus, and Beirut to different parts of the 
globe, a great number choosing New York as their 
refuge. 

Adjustment to this new environment was diffi- 
cult. They had neither knowledge of the language 
of the country, nor friends who could help them. 
Starting out as peddlers, they worked long hours 
for low wages just managing to survive. Though 
they often hovered on the brink of disaster, they did 
not despair but kept on struggling untU they finally 
achieved a respected station in their community. 

In the comparatively short time of half a cen- 
tury, a rapid transformation had taken place. No 
longer were their numbers confined to the East-side 
but Bensonhurst, Flatbush, and Boro Park became 
new grounds for settlement. Their children had 
overcome the language barrier and were able to 
mingle more easily with those around them. Rabbis 
were soon brought over to teach, one of them being 
Rabbi Joseph Kassin of Israel who is the present 
Chief Rabbi and spiritual leader of the United 
States' Syrian Community. In 1926 the Syrian Jews 



established their own synagogue. Last year their 
dream of a Yeshiva was realized. Located in Benson- 
hurst, Yeshiva Mogen David is the first Sephardic 
Yeshiva established in the United States. 

When one visits a Syrian synagogue one is im- 
pressed by an array of colorful customs which have 
developed during hundreds of years of isolated exist- 
ence in Syria. Upon entering the synagogue on a 
Sabbath, one immediately notices that these people 
cling to their religion. There is hardly an unoc- 
cupied seat to be seen. Young and old will be 
noted wearing the "Talis". When the Ark is opened, 
we see the scrolls of the Law, adorned with beautiful 
flowers. When read, the Torah remains in an up- 
right position. As the people leave the synagogue, 
they scent their hands and faces with perfumes 
poured from an iron flask. 

Different customs are observed during the van- 
ous holidays. On the seventh day of Passover, the 
anniversary of the crossing of the Red Sea, the con- 
gregants begin celebrating with prayers and songs in 
the early hours of the morning. 

The Great Sabbath, the Sabbath of Repentance, 
the Sabbath of Remembrance and the "Kalah Sab- 
bath" are commemorated with long and inspiring 
sermons by the Rabbi. The last mentioned Sabbath 
has a very interesting history. After the destruction 
of the Second Temple, Jewry was dispersed through 
the whole of Babylonia. At this period the Jews 
were mostly farmers. During the greater part of 
the year they tilled the soil. The two months' in- 
terval called "Kalah Months" which was not devoted 
to the land was spent in the Yeshivah where the 
populace listened to rousing addresses by the Rabbis. 
This tradition has been maintained to the present 
day, with the Rabbi delivering an address on the 
Sabbath of "Kalah". 

Though transplanted to shores far removed from 
their original source of culture, Syrian Jews have 
succeeded in making their mark in the United States, 
while retaining their great spiritual individuality. 



— 62 — 



Rembrandt 



and the Jews 



By HERZL EISENSTADT 



X HE Jews as a theme in the works of Christian 
artists is a not too recurring one. But upon one 
Christian painter they exerted considerable influ- 
ence. The name of this artist was Rembrandt Van 
Rijn (R.V.R.). 

In the seventeenth century, there lived within 
the midst of the Jews of Amsterdam this renowned 
master artist. Many people seem astonished at the 
utterance of this great figure's name in connection 
with the Jewish people, then considered an inferior 
group. But, as we shall see, the Jews were quite 
devoted to him, and he showed his gratitude with 
masterpieces of portraiture that will outlive the ages. 

During that era, Holland was one of the few 
places in Europe where the Jewish people found 
tolerance, comfort, and even, in some resj>ects, equa- 
lity. It was to this center of refuge that scattered 
individuals and later groups of Marranos (Jews con- 
verted to Christianity who preserved Jewish cus- 
toms in secret) fled from the unbearable furnaces of 
the Inquisitions in Spain and Portugal. They settled 
in the southern section of Amsterdam where they 
returned to the faith of their fathers and, as religious 
Jews, adopted the name of "Sphardim". 

Meanwhile, a second group of Jewish refugees 
fleeing the pogroms of Germany, and a third 
band fleeing from Poland, also found their way to 
the open door of commercial Amsterdam. Their 
customs were different from those of their foreign 
brethren, the Sphardim, and they therefore settled 
in separate but allied communities. Each faction 
built its own synagogues and continued its respective 
modes of life and traditions. 

As is the custom nowadays, rich people in those 
times commissioned famous artists to have their 
portraits drawn. However, many wealthy Jews ab- 
stained from having their likenesses recreated on 
canvas because of their religious beliefs. It was 
art's good fortune that the Sphardim and Askenazim 



1) In various pictures, R.V.R. depicted her with 
a large Bible in her lap, absorbed in the perusal of 
its pages. 



(as the Northern European Jews were titled) had 
different outlooks on the painting of human faces 
and figures. The former, a wealthy class that had 
come into close contaa with the Renaissance in 
Southern Europe while they were disguised as Chris- 
tians, retained the practice of having pictures of 
themselves and others adorn their homes. Therefore 
they did not consider themselves "infidels." The Ash- 
kenazim, on the other hand, abided closely by the 
second commandment which states: "Thou shalt not 
make any graven image unto thee or in any manner 
of likeness of anything . . . ". 

In the museums of Europe and America one will 
often see paintings of aged, bearded scholars titled 
"Portrait of a Jew" or just "Anonymous." These 
figures are representative of those whom Rembrandt 
loved to depict: the Ashkenazi Jews. No doubt, 
these people were of the sect which preached no re- 
creating of human images, yet Rembrandt has used 
them many times, and successfully, as models. The 
impression left upon the beholder of one of Van 
Rijn's Jewish portraits is, in most cases, that of view- 
ing people of spiritual eminence and scholarly inclin- 
ation rather than people of business (then the major 
occupation of the population of Amsterdam). Since 
the love and admiration of the Hebrews of that time 
was centered upon their spiritual leaders, art critics 
presume that it was their images which Van Rijn was 
commissioned to preserve for posterity. Through 
them, Rembrandt has immortalized the pillar of the 
Jewish communit), the most powerful symbol of its 
life in exile, tlie Rabbi. 

A second phase of Van Rijn's interest in Jew- 
ish life is his scenes taken from the daily life of 
the Jews of Amsterdam. The first, called "The 
Jewish Bride", depicts a majestic woman adorned in 
the raiment of her wedding day. She is splendidly 
attired, and is shown seated in a chair and holding 
a scroll in her hand. The traditional bridal veil is 
shown by her side, and the scroll is interpreted by 
most people to be her "Ketubah" or m.irri.ige con- 
tract. 

The second picture, designated "The Synagogue," 



— 63 



is believed to represent the religious life of the 
Ashkenazi Jews. It shows a group of men, in the 
attire of the poorer class of Holland, gathered out- 
side of a "shul". Moreover, it demonstrates their 
customs in that (1) there is no "Ezras Nashim" as 
in the Sphardic shuls, but instead the women prayed 
in an anteroom; (2) the door to the synagogue was 
usually inconspicuous; and (3) Rembrandt, evident- 
ly impressed by the deep symbolism, clearly por- 
trayed the steps leading from the door down to the 
first floor, usually below ground level. This con- 
struction was based upon the words of the 130th 
Psalm: "Out of the depths have I called unto Thee, 
O Lord". Incidentally, whether by accident or de- 
sign, Van Rijn painted exactly ten men, known as 
a "Minyan". 

Another theme to which Rembrandt returned 
time and again is the Bible. From the time that 
his mother had read aloud to him from the Bible, 1) 
he had often looked into it himself, and he gathered 
from it ever new inspiration. It was the Jewish 
Bible that especially spurred his imagination, for 
it contained not only one but many central figures 
whose emotions, activities, and reactions were those 
of mortals, not of gods, and thus more suited to 
his, and to his contemporaries', type of art. Rem- 
brandt was, in essence, a naturalist who aimed to 
approach nature as closely as possible. He met Jews 
who were descendants of those biblical figures that 
had so deeply interested him, and their presence 
suggested the idea of using them in his paintings. 
Also of worthwhile note is that in the theatres of 
those days plays based upon Jewish Biblical themes 
were frequently presented. There can be little doubt 
that pictorial representations of these themes were 
in demand. R.V.R.'s works found encouragement 
and acceptance. 

To summarize briefly his Biblical scenes, I shall 
cite the following. Rembrandt avoided the days 
of creation, a frequent theme of preceding artists. 
To him, the Bible began with the transgression of 
Adam and Eve. By radically departing from the 
accepted portrayals of them as a pair of beautifully 



2) "Rembrandt and the Bible" by Franz Landsberger. 

3) Rembrandt was familiar with the Hebrew alphabet 
for he often used it in many of his religious paint- 
ings: It is believed that he studied the Hebrew 
language at a Dutch University. 



created beings, he depicts them after their sinful acts 
as objects of scorn and disgust. Their features and 
figures and those of the wicked serpent are dis- 
torted to unattractive proportions. His prejudice, 
morals and imagination are clearly reflected here, 
as in many other instances. He pictorially tries to 
judge and assay either man's sin, greed, and wicked- 
ness or his noble and God-fearing qualities. 

Jacob was a favorite character of R.V.R. An 
etching shows "Jacob Caressing His Son Benjamin" 
who is joyfully playing with an apple. This picture 
is representative of the intimacy of Jewish life. 2) 
Another sketch shows "Jacob Blessing Menasseh and 
Ephraim". Van Rijn had not forgotten how Joseph 
attempted to sway his father's hands so that the 
right would be upon the head of the elder and the 
left upon that of the younger. This action is clear- 
ly portrayed. The inclusion of Joseph's wife in 
this scene, even though not mentioned in the Bible, 
is based upon the Midrash. 

One painting definitely stands out to those fami- 
liar with the Prophets. In it a woman of middle 
age is shown seated upon a chair with a book in 
her lap. A boy with folded hands is kneeling beside 
her and is evidently being instructed in his first 
prayer. In the background is a couple holding an 
infant in their arms. The picture is regarded as re- 
presenting Hannah tutoring the child Samuel. The 
couple in the background are believed to be Hannah 
and Elkanah, who are first bringing Samuel to the 
Temple at Shiloh. This assumption is substantiated 
by the fact that on the wall of the room are two 
tablets with the ten commandments written upon 
them in Hebrew. 3) 

Completing the above series, there are three 
pictures covering the story of Samson and Delilah, 
a theme which fascinated our artist. The banquet 
scene has Samson's betrothed perched elegantly upon 
a throne, dressed as the maiden in the "Jewish 
Bride". On the table before her is the cup from 
which the wedded couple drink wine together, again 
attributed to R.V.R.'s knowledge of Jewish tradition. 
The two other paintings consist of (1) "Samson's 
Indignation at the Trickery of his Father-in-law" 
and (2) "The Blinding of Samson". 

We may be proud of the fact that the Jewish 
people were to a notable extent influential in the 
production of famous works by a renowned Chris- 
tian master who, through his work, has given pleasure 
and enlightenment to the world of art. 



64 — 



^a^^ Steia^^ec^ 



B/ HERBERT DYM 



X HE most striking feature one encounters in a 
perusal of John Steinbeck's works is the sheer literary 
genius with which the man is endowed. Con- 
noisseurs of literature the world over acclaim him 
as a writer with a sure but subtle feeling for literary 
effect, a storyteller with infinite skill in shaping the 
stuff of our lives in forms that delight the mind and 
the imagination. One of his more enthusiastic ad- 
mirers refers to him as ""a born musician, a finder 
of melodies, a natural shaper of harmonies, a Schu- 
bert or a Brahms".!) 

The reason for the esteem in which Steinbeck's 
works are held is not too easy to explain. It is not 
simply because of the lifelikeness or thruthfulness of 
his writings — these skills are at the command of 
many second-rate authors. There is something more 
present, a skill which defies exact description. It 
is probably a combination of various abilities such 
as verve, gusto, a delicate and individual touch, rich 
imagination, and boldness and freedom of expression. 
Whatever that skill is, Steinbeck has it in abundance. 

It must be admitted that this esteem for Stein- 
beck's writings is not universal. The last named 
quality of freedom of expression makes for a certain 
ruthlessness or cruelty in its treatment of human 
nature. The lack of compromise with which Stein- 
beck uncovers man's inhumanity to man does not 
always make pleasant or relaxing reading. There 
are some who think this boldness of writing over- 
done, that it is unkind and somehow immoral to 
present the truth so nakedly. They argue that there 
is no need for profanity or brutality in a novel. To 
this Steinbeck answers, "... The speech of working- 
men may seem a little bit racy to ladies' clubs but 
since ladies' clubs won't believe that such things go 
on anyway, it does not matter. I know this speech 
and I'm sick of workingmen being gelded of their 
natural expression until they talk with a fine Oxonian 
flavor ... A workingman bereft of his profanity is 
a silent man". However, everyone agrees that he 
does present the truth, and whether or not it should 
be treated in its unvarnished form is a matter of 
one's personal squeamishness. The recent trend in 
literature has been toward the frank, naked, realistic 



1. American Fiction J.W. Beach, Pg. 310 



facts of life and those who find this distasteful will 
have to resign themselves to it. 

Steinbeck's works deal primarily with the lowly 
people of the world, that is with the simple, help- 
less people for whom the question of the next 
meal is the major problem of daily existence. His 
greatest work on this subject is the world-famous 
"Grapes of Wrath". But before producing this 
superb masterpiece Steinbeck served his apprentice- 
ship with two earlier books which were widely read 
and hailed by most critics. The first of these was 
"Tortilla Flat" (1935) and the second was "Of 
Mice and Men" (1937). 

**TORTILLA FLAT" is unmistakably a literary feat. 
This book is a skillful blending of gra^■eness and 
playfulness, of sweet simplicity and gentle humor. 
The subject of the book is the paisano of Monterey, 
who is, as Steinbeck tells us, "a mixture of Spanish, 
Indian, Mexican, and assorted Caucasian bloods. He 
speaks a mixture of English and Spanish with a 
paisano accent". He lives on the outskirts of the 
town of Monterrey, has little propert)' and is even 
less subject to the civic and financial troubles of 
other citizens. Steinbeck's particular subject is one 
Danny and his friends Pilon, Pablo, Portagee Joe, 
Jesus Maria Corcoran and a certain ragamuffin called 
the Pirate. 

These men have no occupation, but live a "catch 
as catch can" existence, never looking any farther 
than the next meal or jug of wine. When Danny's 
grandfather dies, he leaves him two small unpainted 
houses as an inheritance. Danny promptly occupies 
one and finds himself for the first time in his life 
a man with a roof over his head, burdened with 
the cares of property. Unable to carry this burden 
alone, he invites his friends to join him. They 
occupy the second house, but never pay him any 
rent except for an occasional purloined chicken or 
jug of wine. Shortly, in their childlike irresponsibility, 
they burn down their house, and then promptly move 
in with Danny who welcomes them on condition 
that no one occupy his bed but himself. The Pirate 
and his five mangy dogs soon join them. A special 
corner is assigned to the dogs, and the\ all live 
happily together. 



65 — 



In writing of Danny and his friends and of the 
eventful life they lead, Steinbeck brings his literary 
skill into full play. In his sure but subtle manner 
he brings the paisanos to life, endowing them with 
the quaint and humorous characteristics that merge 
them so successfully with their habitat. He presents 
them as frank in manner, fond of wine and women, 
full of charity, piety and good nature, and ingenious 
in their odd ways of obtaining food and drink. At 
the same time they are shiftless and lazy, ignorant 
and superstitious, inveterate if petty thieves, and 
closely akin to drunkards. On the whole they are 
charming in their simplicity and quaint in their un- 
conscious humor. Steinbeck answers the critics who 
were looking for a definite theme, thusly, "Far 
from having a definite theme running through this 
book, one of the intents is to show that rarely does 
anything in the lives of these people survive the 
night". One may conclude, therefore, that the blend- 
ing of these people with their background is an 
artistic circumstance and not presented as a social 
problem. 

CTEINBECK'S next major literary venture is in a 
way in a very different vein, as far removed as 
possible from the gentle comedy of "Tortilla Flat". 
"Of Mice and Men" is a tragic story of a friendship 
among migratory laborers, told with a blunt direct- 
ness and a severe economy of words which serves 
effectively to heighten the drama of the story. It 
is the tale of two men whose custom it is to move 
from ranch to ranch, earning a little stake, spending 
it in town as soon as they get it, and passing on to 
another place where money might be had. One 
of these men is the mentally defective Lennie, huge 
of frame and colossal in strengch, but as simple as a 
child and helplessly dependent on the care of his 
friend George. Although Lennie is a millstone 
round his neck, George is deeply attached to him, 
knowing that without him Lennie would be hope- 
lessly lost. The huge Lennie has a child's passion 
for small animals, which he loves to pet; but his 
strength is so great that the frail creatures are in- 
variably broken and killed, to his great sorrow. 
Although Lennie earnestly wishes to keep from doing 
wrong, he is constantly getting into trouble, de- 
pending on his friend George to extricate him. Final- 
ly, with the same good intentions, his great strength 
claims a woman for its victim, and George is forced 
to kill Lennie in order to save him from lynching. 

One simply must read this book in order to 
appreciate fully the degree of humanity and beauty 



with which Steinbeck invests this tragic episode. 
The almost paternal affection of George for his 
blundering friend and the sore, numbing grief he 
suffers over the necessity of finally dispatching him 
by his own hand — all this is brought home without 
any use of direct or sentimental phrase. It is Stein- 
beck's subtle effectiveness at its best, bringing his 
characters to vivid life. Throughout the story there 
lies the background of life in the bunkhouse, show- 
ing the essential decency and pathos of these rough, 
homeless men whom circumstance has condemned to 
a life of squalor. The story points out effectively 
the sore plight of these unfortunate migratory 
workers, but Steinbeck felt (although many disagree 
with him) that he did not get across the "earth 
longings of a Lennie who was not to represent in- 
sanity at all but the inarticulate and powerful yearn- 
ing of all men". Thus we see that in this book, 
unlike in the previously mentioned one, Steinbeck 
was not content only with the strictly imaginative fac- 
tors of the drama, but strived for a deeper meaning. 



Dr one to 



/^N looking back it is not too difficult for 

see how these two novels laid the groundwork for 
Steinbeck's greatest work. By the time he came 
to "Grapes of Wrath" he had acquired the experience 
and the deft touch necessary to make this novel both 
a literary masterpiece and a powerful sociological 
thesis. It is undoubtedly the finest example produced 
in the United States of the type of novel that deals 
primarily with a social problem. 

The story of "Grapes of Wrath" is simple and 
unadorned. It is the tale of a family of tenant 
farmers in Oklahoma, the Joads. Their crops are 
ruined by the great dust storms, they are deprived of 
their land by the banking syndicate, and like thou- 
sands of other "Okie" families they decide to em- 
bark on the long overland trek to California in the 
hope of finding employment. They acquire a rickety 
second-hand Hudson six, convert it into a sort of 
motorized covered wagon, slaughter their pigs for 
food, take along such possessions as are indispen- 
sable, and set out for California. 

The Joads are typical of the self-respecting peo- 
ple of old American stock who hardly had enough 
to fill their bellies. Their speech and manners are 
crude, but there is in them a sound root of wisdom 
and generosity, of courage and persistence. Tom, 
the eldest son, although a fine boy, has killed a 
man in a brawl. He is breaking parole by leaving 
the state, but he cannot abandon his family. Ex- 
preacher Casey, the thinker of the group, has lost 



66 



his faith in religion but is ardently seeking to find 
the way of truth and righteousness in human affairs. 
The strongest character of all is Ma, a veritable 
tower of strength in all that concerns the family 
welfare, and whose great mission is to keep the 
family intact. But it is her misfortune to see the 
members of the family fall away one by one under 
the stress of their experiences. 

The story describes the hardships of the journey 
to California, the deaths of Grandpa and Grandma, 
and the surprise of those remaining at finding them- 
selves unwelcome and despised in California. They 
are pushed around by the police, and fail to find 
decent employment. Casey is killed by strike-breakers, 
and Tom becomes a fugitive from the law. Daugh- 
ter Rosasharn's husband deserts her and her baby 
is born dead in a box-car during the autumn floods. 
The last scene shows Ma, Pa, and the three remain- 
ing children taking refuge in a barn where they 
find a man dying of starvation. Rosasharn nurses 
him back to life with the milk nature had intended 
for her child. 

Again it is necessary to read the book in order 
to gain the full flavor of the intense drama and 
poignant beauty which lie behind the simple narrative 
style in which Steinbeck presents his story. It sum- 
marizes, in essence, what must have gone on thou- 
sands of times in the great tragedy of the dust bowl. 

By the ingenious insertion of short but power- 
ful chapters which digress from the main narrative 
to cover the general situation, Steinbeck gives his 
story a broadening aspect, encompassing the hordes 
of mortals who are involved in the same epic migra- 
tion. Thus, along with the concrete incidents, one 
sees the social forces at play which give rise to these 
incidents. A fine example of this is the well-known 
chapter seven, with its dizzying riot of sales talk, 
bewildered and frightened farmers, old tires, wheezy 



motors, bargains, profits, and overall confusion. It 
is extremely well developed, almost like a poem in 
free verse. 

This book as a whole, as well as Steinbeck's 
earlier works, leaves several pertinent questions un- 
answered. Exactly what his economic theories are 
and how he proposes to apply them are difficult to 
ascertain. His books offer no specific answers to 
these questions. They point out what we already 
know: that our economic system, our methods of 
production and finance, involve innumerable instances 
of cruel injustice and hardship. It is clear that 
Steinbeck holds the community responsible for the 
man without work or food. He intimates that what 
cannot be cured by individual effort must be met 
by collective measures. It is important that people 
be made aware of the unsolved social problems within 
our system, and an effective way of doing this is 
to present actual vivid instances of these problems 
by means of fiction. For this reason, Steinbeck's 
works, particularly "Grapes of Wrath", are docu- 
ments of educational value. 

Steinbeck's works gain emotional power by deal- 
ing with social problems, but what makes them 
notable works of fiction is the very effective dramati- 
zation of these problems in individual situations and 
characters. Steinbeck's people are colorful, pitiful, 
racy, disorderly, well-meaning, ignorant, loyal and 
obstinate. They are brought to life by Steinbeck's 
unsurpassed skill as an author. 

Although these novels have been written re- 
cently, it is safe to predirt that they will remain 
foremost on the list of great American literature. 
By the same token, John Steinbeck has assured him- 
self of a niche in literary history alongside America's 
greatest authors for his masterful writing technique 
and his deft characterizations as e.xemplified in these 
novels. 



67 



BEGTHOIEnilASMylnMus 



HE freeing of a people from the stackles of 
bondage is a long and difficult process, and one that 
requires many leaders. However, the release of music 
from the bonds of conformity and classicism, and 
its consequent emergence as an independent art, was 
accomplished by Ludwig Van Beethoven in a relative- 
ly short time. There was not one phase of music that 
escaped the attention of Beethoven's genius. The 
arts of symphony, concerti, opera, sonata and chamber 
music composition were all changed by one man. 
The changes that were wrought shaped the develop- 
ment of music for succeeding generations. 

Beethoven was born into a poor and somewhat 
musical family. His father Johann, a musician, was 
never too successful in his profession because of his 
affinity for drink. His mother was a simple woman, 
devoted to her son. Young Beethoven showed a fair 
amount of talent at an early age, and his father 
decided to take advantage of it. Mozart, the child 
prodigy, had successfully toured the continent. Jo- 
hann was determined to give his son an opportunity 
to make his mark in society. The arranged tour was 
not successful and the father returned a disillusioned 



In his late teens, Beethoven went to Vienna, the 
center oi' musical life, with the financial assistance of 
Count Waldstein. With the aid of this generous 
nobleman, he was introduced to the aristocracy. He 
soon became the rage of society because of his 
virtuosity and his abUity to improvise on any given 
tune. 

The attitude of Beethoven toward the aristocracy 
which supported him, clearly shows his contempt 
for the forced inferior position which they imposed 
on his fellow musicians of that era. As a result of 
Beethoven's inflexible position, the musician attained 
his self respect and true worth in society. Up to 
Beethoven's time a composer had to rely on a patron 
for his subsistence. He spent his whole life pouring 
out work after work for the edification of his usually 
unappreciative patron. The classic example of this 
prototype is Haydn. Haydn spent over thirty years 
in the service of the Esterhazy family composing his 



By HERBERT LEIBOWITZ 

many symphonies and string quartets. This musical 
stagnation riled Beethoven's independent spirit. He 
resented being looked down on when in reality the 
composer, being a creative force of society, should 
be looked up to. Beethoven's attitude is reflected in 
the following incident. One day, while he was stroll- 
ing with the great German poet Goethe down a 
narrow street, a royal party approaching from the 
opposite direction sought to pass the compatriots by. 
Goethe stepped aside to let them pass, but Beethoven 
stood still, just nodding. His impassivity shocked 
Goethe who believed in the imperium of the upper 
class. 

Beethoven began taking lessons in counterpoint 
from Haydn, but the two forever fought over Beeth- 
oven's ideas. The cantankerous and classical Hadyn 
was peeved at, and troubled by, Beethoven's origin- 
ality. The two soon severed relations. The split was 
predestined, for Haydn represented the death of 
classicism with its stolidity, and Beethoven repres- 
ented the birth of romanticism with its accompany- 
ing emotion. Yet, it took many years before Beeth- 
oven grudgingly admitted learning much from Haydn. 

Beethoven began to compose with a prolific pen 
and his first two symphonies were performed while 
he was in his early twenties. The people and the 
critics did not understand the music, calling it dis- 
sonant; though Mozartean in style, it proved too 
radical for them, and was not a financial or artistic 
success. It is very strange and somewhat tragic tha 
the greatness of a composer is never recognized 
until after his death. Just about this time Beethoven 
received the first warnings of his impending deafness 
and as a result became subject to fits of despair. That 
a composer should lose his hearing is as cruel as a 
painter losing his eyesight. 

The musical world was unprepared for the next 
thunderbolt from the pen of Beethoven. His third 
symphony, subtitled the "Eroica", completely stunned 
them. Its very length, being twice as long as any 
previous symphony, was deplored. The audacity of 
putting a Funeral March in the form of the forgotten 
fugue in a symphony, astonished even the avant- 
garde of the time. However, as time is the true judge 



68 — 



n 



of worth, the "Eroica" today is recognized as a mas- 
terpiece and its length is not annoying to the ear. 
The symphon) symbolizes freedom in the most pow- 
erful sense of the word. Beethoven, who was in- 
fluenced by the French Revolution, wrote the 
"Eroica" to express the feelings of an oppressed 
people liberated from the bonds of slavery and servi- 
tude. The majestic nobility of the Funeral March 
is enough to touch even the most bitter hearts. 

Beethoven was a great lover of nature. An ugly 
man, repulsive to the eye, he loved to wander through 
the hillsides of Austria to communicate with Nature's 
loveliness. His "Pastorale" symphony reflects this great 
love of nature. It was the first example of program 
music. Beethoven found in nature a refuge from 
the incessant bickering that perturbed mankind, and 
from his own deafness. Nature caused him to raise 
a joyful voice to Heaven in a song of gratitude to 
the Creator and an increased output flowed from 
his pen. 

The contribution of Beethoven to the field of opera 
was great despite the fact that he wrote only one 
opera, Fidelio. The topic he chose was, again, freedom 
of the individual. The orchestra was given more 
prominence and the dramatic meaning of the opera 
was increased in importance. These changes were 
the precursor of what Richard Wagner wrought later 
on. Fidelio caused Beethoven much grief due to its 
lack of popularity. It so embittered him that he 
never wrote another opera. 

The next phase of Beethoven's life was very un- 
productive. He wasted his time, and, more important, 
his strength, as the legal guardian of his nephew. 
The frivolity and shiftlessness of his charge preyed 
on Beethoven's mind and caused him to stop com- 
posing. It was only after he painfully severed rela- 
tions with his nephew that Beethoven, realizing he 
did not have much more time to live, started to com- 
pose again. 

Beethoven became morose and went into temporary 



seclusion during which time he wrote the greatest 
of all symphonies, symphony number nine, with a 
choral movement based on Schiller's Ode to Joy "O 
friends, no more these sounds continue! Let us raise a 
song of sympathy, of gladness. O joy, let us praise 
thee!". Beethoven long had toyed with the idea of 
using Schiller's text, and it was only after much deli- 
beration that he finally decided to inject the choral 
movement into the symphony. 

There were many innovations in the writing of the 
symphony. The kettle-drum, given a prominence as 
never before, is used to remarkable effect. The third 
movement is called the "epitome of Beethoven's 
many slow movements". The fourth Movement in- 
corporates the chorus in the symphony for the first 
time. The impact of the chorus is so great that it 
intensifies the cry for brotherhood. Such eloquence 
has never been surpassed in the annals of music. 
There was an element of tragedy at the conclusion 
of the first performance of this symphony in Vienna. 
With the audience loudly acclaiming him, Beethoven 
heard nothing as he continued beating time after 
time the coda. He had to be turned to see the 
acclamation. 

Beethoven continued composing and in his last 
works, sonatas and string quartets, he reached the 
depths of introversion and maturity. He died amid a 
tremendous clap of thunder just as Lord Byron had 
died. 

It was very apt that the free world, fighting against 
the tyranny of Hitler, adopted the opening theme 
of Beethoven's fifth Symphony as the symbol of 
victory against despotism, for all his life Beethoven 
fought against all that Hitler exemplified. 

Beethoven was a revolutionist and his effect on 
musical composition will be eternal. His greatness, 
though, is manifested even more by his love for his 
fellow man and the brotherhood he hoped for. If 
we were to live up to the ideals set for us by this 
great master, the world would be a much better one. 



— 69 



TIME 

By JOSEPH KAHANE 

I've sat and pondered many a day 

About this question of age. 
Why must we grow old and gray 

And someday leave this stage? 

When I was young this bothered me not. 

Why, I was happy and glad. 
Who'd think of things so eerie and odd 

Who'd think of things so sad? 

I gained a year not long ago 

And I'll gain another soon. 
Why it was nine when last I looked 

And soon it will be noon. 

Seconds steal into hours 

And hours, just twenty-four make a day 
While days turn into years so quick 

And years turn black hair gray. 




Sducatm 

B/ ALAN SEELENFREUND 

Is education what we need 

To love G-d's law, and His word heed? 

Does education tell us why in life 

We face so much hardship and strife 

Is education of any value 

When cold clammy death does near you? 

Does it help the tiller of the soil 

In completing his work and easing his toil? 

Does it benefit the miner down in the shaft 

Who may be led to death like an innocent calf? 

The warmonger in fury stoking his furnace. 

Does education stop him from being a menace? 

Does education keep us from perpetual wars 

Which leave on mankind terrible scars? 

Does it aid and comfort you when you fear death, 

And grasp in desperation your last breath? 

Still education must have a worth, /f 

Or else why expose us to it from birth. ' ■ 

Just what it is I cannot say, 

But I hope to understand it some day. 

I guess education is here to stay. 



H»oy^ 



'T^ Sxfi^cUtca*t t^t 'pisUiecC 



K, 



, OMAR had been planning for 400 years to have 
the inhabitants of Kur colonize the third planet of 
the Kurian solar system. As seen through the 
powerful Kurian telescopes 400 years ago, the Green 
Planet seemed to be a potential paradise for the 
teeming masses that inhabited Kur. It was known 
that two-legged creatures dominated the planet 
but Komar considered them to be only savages and 
easily overcome by the Kurians. 

Before he would trust sending a colonizing ex- 
pedition by way of the anti-gravitational machines, 
he sent some exploration expeditions to get a closer 
look at the planet and to bring back pictures of it 
and of its intricate details. 

The first expedition should have arrived there 
about 1660. It had not returned and Komar waited 
250 years for a more perfect antigravitational to be 
made before sending the second and third expedi- 
tions. These two also had not returned. The fourth 
expedition had been sent in 1940. 

It was now 1946. Twenty anti-gravitationals 
had left Kur in four expeditions and none had re- 
turned. The population of Kur had trebled since 
the last census, and according to Komar's original 
plan, the colonization was to have begun 200 years 
ago. He wondered why none of the expeditions had 
returned. The last machine had been sent equipped 
with an automatic homing device. While Komar 
was contemplating the problem, his viewer-phone 
rang and informed him of the return of the latest 
machine. He quickly went to the landing station 
and entered the machine. The members of the crew 
were dead, without a visible mark on them. Their 
features were a hideous contortion of terror. It 
had been ages since Komar had seen a dead Kurian, 
and it enraged and disgusted him at the same time. 
Komar examined the photographs taken by the ill- 
fated expedition, and found that the last plate 
showed red and black colorings and nothing else. 
What was it about these photographs that could 
have shocked his explorers to death? Did the same 
thing prevent the other expeditions from returning? 
Komar decided with grim determination to find out 
for himself. Another exploratory anti-gravitational 



2.y BERNARD ERLBAUM 

was prepared. It was outfitted with pilot, navigator, 
photographer, and scientist, with Komar as observer. 

Levar was appointed as head of Kurian affairs 
while Komar was gone. Levar was an Anti-Colo- 
nialist, and believed that Kur itself had facilities to 
give adequate homes to all native Kurians now, and 
for many years in the future. 

The trip was an interesting one for Komar, who 
had never before left his own planet. Soon the Green 
Planet was sighted, and the tremendous speed of the 
anti-gravitational was decreased. To Komar the sphere 
seemed more beautiful than it had through the tele- 
scope. He could not conceive what this wonderful 
thing could possess that had terrified the former 
expedition, thus causing its destruction. As the anti- 
gravitational entered the planet's atmosphere, Komar 
saw a silvery object floating through the air toward 
him. The object was a flying machine, obviously 
inferior in all respects to the Kurian anti-gravita- 
tional, but it was undoubtedly piloted by one of the 
more intelligent creatures that inhabited the planet. 
Komar, unwilling to make contact as yet, ordered a 
speedy getaway. As the machine sped over vast areas 
of blue, and then beautiful green plains, the photo- 
graphic mechanism worked steadily. The machine 
was speeding serenely along when suddenly the green 
below was interrupted by a mass of expanding red 
and yellow, that consumed the green and transformed 
it to black. ""How disgusting," Komar thought. He 
asked the scientist what this strange red mass was. 
The scientist answered that it was completelv stranoe 
to him too, but that he would gladl)- analyze it if 
some of it could be gotten. Thereupon, a specimen 
of the unknown substance was obtained, and the 
scientist touched the red portion. It stung him, and 
blackened his limb. Undaunted, he examined it more 
closely. Suddenly terror spread over his features, for 
it was an oxygen-eating, carbon-creating beast that 
probably inhabited this planet. "We will never be 
able to settle here," he thought. All at once the 
thought of a creature that devoured oxygen struck 
them. This was a planet inhabited by a beast that was 
consuming the Kurian's sole life-maintainer at an 
enormous rate. Komar, dvinq of shock, now realized 



— 71 — 



why the others hadn't returned. The shock suddenly Semitic languages looked up, thought awhile, and 

overcame the pilot too, the anti-gravitation creator realized to his amazement that the London Fire in 

was cut off, and the machine began streaking toward 1666, the Chicago and San Francisco fires at the 

the ground . . . turn of the centur)', the Hiroshima fire after the 

Here the log found inside the so called flying dropping of the A-bomb, and a large but only or- 

saucer that had crashed in Arizona ended with sick- dinary forest fire had all combined to save the people 

ening abruptness. Dr. Manly Bern, professor of of the earth from probable annihilation. 

Eternalized Words 

By BERNARD ERLBAUM 

"Give me liberty, or give me death". 
Are words inspiring many a one's last breath. 
Four U.S. airmen entombed in a Red dungeon. 
Recall these staunch words that struck like a bludgeon. 

"Not one cent for tribute, but millions for defense". 
What a world of common sense! 
If that's the policy we would adhere to now. 
No bullying would there be from bloody Moscow. 

"Don't fire till you see the whites of their eyes". 

Shouts a battle-worn captain in Chosen. 
Then a soldier shoots and another dies, 

And from the north, a stench-filled wind blows 

"We have met the enemy and they are ours", 

America has prevailed throughout the years; 
No matter how great were their iron towers, 

We always won with blood, sweat, and tears. 

"Lafayette, we are here", again and again. 
When will it come, oh when, oh when? 
The time that we come to France, not to fight, 
But to tour and enjoy, the Parisian night. 

"Don't give up the ship". 

Whether on the sea or of state. 
All our foes we will whip. 

And show them how low they rate. 

"Gentlemen cry peace, peace, but theic is no peace", 

A palace in Paris points to that plea. 
What matters who serves, whether White Russia or 

Greece, 

Just stay the world wide from self -butchery. 

How alive are these words. 

As if they were uttered by those living today. 
But they are now the Lord's; 

He won't let them perish in limbo, as mortals 
may. 

— 72 — 



Changing Views Of The American Revolution 



D. 



'elving into the life of the times that tried men's 
souls has produced a number of novels of the 
American Revolution. These novels can be classified 
according to the period during which they were 
written. If the book was published on or before 
1880, the writers were too close to the revolution 
to have a true perspective. Consequently, these 
writers saw the revolution purely as a military in- 
cident and busied themselves with a resume of its 
strateg) and glorification of its heroes. All the 
Redcoats and Tories were pictured as villains while 
Washington and his men were the heroes. 

The notable exception of this school of thought 
was James Fenimore Cooper, a writer who tended 
to present both sides of the story. His novel "The 
Spy", pictured the war as distinctly fratricidal. 

Recent novels show a clearer perspective of those 
times. They have been more frank in presenting 
the ignoble as well as the heroic aspects of the war. 
Many of them reverse conventional opinions of the 
past including traditionally held opinions of men 
such as Benedict Arnold and Thomas Paine. There 
also have been tendencies to make a case for the 
Tories and the English. . 

I shall attempt to delve at length into the treat- 
ment accorded to the last named individuals or 
groups by writers past and present. 

The case of Benedict Arnold will be considered 
first. Past writers have made his name synonomous 
with that of traitor. They pictured him as a jeal- 
ous person constantly in debt, one who betrayed 
his country for a price, and as one who was only 
too glad to have the chance to hand West Point 
over to the British. A story is told of the prisoner 
who was asked by Arnold what the Americans 
would do to him if he were captured. The answer 
came promptly. "They will cut off that short leg 
of yours that was wounded at Quebec and Saratoga 
and bury it with all the honors of war, then hang 
the rest of you as a traitor." This more or less was 
the opinion of most of the early writers on Arnold. 

However, a new concept of Benedict Arnold has 
emerged with present day writers. Kenneth Roberts 



By MARVIN BLACKMAN 



in his book "Rabble in Arms" sheds a completely 
different light on Arnold's so-called betrayal. In 
order to explain how he arrived at this conclusion, 
a closer look at conditions during this period is 
necessary. 

Congress at the time was different from the pres- 
ent day Congress in these respects. It had no Presi- 
dent who could assist it, and no Senate to control 
it; neither Supreme Court to guard and direct it, 
nor Cabinet to inform it. Because of these condi- 
tions it had no power over the different states. 
Yet, since it exercised control over our army it was 
the Government even though the states would not 
admit its authority. Inasmuch as it did not have the 
powers to tax, and since the currency it printed had 
no value, it was obliged to turn to some source for 
money. And so it turned to France. By doing so, 
it put a sort of desperation into the hearts of the 
patriots who knew France and the French. 

Congress was extremely prejudiced on the subjea 
of the French. Any French officer who came to 
Congress demanding a commission in the army re- 
ceived it immediately, regardless of his ability or 
lack of same. At the same time, it still withheld 
from Arnold the rank of Major-General despite his 
brilliant efforts which had so amply earned it. 

Arnold knew at long last that the muddle-headed 
politicians in Congress who were piling blunder 
upon blunder, were, in spite of all our sacrifices, 
forcing us closer and closer to chaos, into the eager 
arms of France, a nation whose grip would be more 
despotic and tyrannical than that of England. To 
this world Arnold said "No! This imbecilic, coward- 
ly Congress must not destroy the freedom that we 
have fought so hard to gain." 

If Arnold sought to give everything to England 
until we had regained our strength, it was done 
only with the highest, patriotic intention to fight a 
threat greater than that of England. It was only 
an occurrence that could not have been foreseen that 
branded Arnold a traitor. This was the Constitu- 
tional Convention that corrected the inefficiencies of 
Congress. Had this country fallen into French 



73 — 



hands, Arnold might have been seen in the light of 
a hero and not that of traitor to his country. 

The next case I should like to consider is that 
of another patriot, Tom Paine. 

Early writers described him as a filthy little atheist. 
They completely forgot his rallying the American 
forces, giving them the incentive to fight the Eng- 
lish. The fact that Paine had written a treatise 
called "The Age of Reason" which completely broke 
down many religious principles and completely de- 
bunked religion, overshadowed all else. They also 
found fault with him in that he had written a letter 
to George Washington, villifying him. This did 
not hurt Washington but it did damn Paine. 

Modern writers, however, such as Howard Fast 
in his book "Citizen Tom Paine" take a more lib- 
eral attitude. Fast sees in Paine a writer whose 
words in "Common Sense" and "The Crisis Papers" 
stirred and spurred his new fellow countrymen far 
more than any other words by tongue or pen, with 
the possible exception of that of the Declaration of 
Independence. While all men were hesitating over 
the audacity of final separation from Britain, Paine 
spoke out. "Why falter? Why delay.' Be free. A 
great destiny is before you. Show yourselves worthy 
of it." He preached Federal Union, that petty jeal- 
ousies and local narrowness be forgotten. "Our 
great title is 'Americans', our inferior one varies 
with the place". It was he who coined the phrase 
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 

Fast acknowledges that Paine wrote "The Age of 
Reason." "Does that detract from the fact that Paine 
was really one of the main reasons for the success 
of our country . . . and one to whom we as a nation 
owe a debt.'" He throws insults on the people who 
denounced Paine, a man whose slogan was ever 
"Nil Desperandum". 

On Paine's return from France he was denied the 
right to vote. Here was a man whose efforts towards 
the establishment of our government helped estab- 
lish this right of suffrage, being denied the right 
to vote. Because of this, Paine's slogan "Nil Des- 



perandum" was aptly mistranslated in later life into 
"Nothing but despair". 

My last subject is how writers have treated Rebels 
and Loyalists. 

I don't think I have to devote many words to 
the subject of how writers of the past depicted 
"Loyalists". The reason is that today, after the 
lapse of 150 years, readers still do not like to hear 
of the rascality of the patriotic leaders nor of the 
brutality of Tory-baiting mobs. When Kenneth 
Roberts recently published his book "Oliver Wis- 
well", which defended the Loyalist viewpoint, a 
storm of criticism was unleashed. Had this been 
written when public opinion did not permit any 
deviation from the accepted viewpoint of Loyalist 
treachery, burning this writer at the stake would 
have been possibly the lightest sentence imposed. 

"Oliver Wiswell" is, in short, an apologia for 
colonials who remained loyal to the crown. They 
had taken an oath of allegiance to the king, and 
since their opinion of any one who renounced that 
oath was a low one, they believed themselves in 
the right. They were in the majority, and their 
battalions fought valiantly; but they had the mis- 
fortune to be caught between the British regulars 
who refused to consider them competent, and the 
Rebels who regarded them as traitors. In this book 
John Hancock is depicted as a smuggler, Patrick 
Henry a rabble rouser, and Samuel Adams a snob 
mistrustful of the "Sons of Liberty". The British 
also come in for their share of debunking. 

It is apparent from the above illustrations that 
the era of the Revolutionary War has been given 
varied treatment by writers of fiction both past 
and present. Early writers regarding the Revolu- 
tion as a military incident, busied themselves with 
reviewing its strategy and glorifying its heroes. 
Latter day writers, through different perspectives, 
have reconstructed its social and economic phases 
and have given greater attention to the civilian ele- 
ment. Some recent writers have chosen particular 
controversial incidents of the war rather than great 
names. A revisionist attitude has developed in re- 



— 74 — 



i! 



gard to characters like Paine and Arnold, among 
others. The sense of bewilderment over changing 
conditions now enters the picture, and the bungling 
on both sides of the conflict has been exposed. 



The times that tried men's souls have produced a 
great number of historical novels, each one endeav- 
oring to present to us a clearer picture and better 
understanding of our American Revolution. 



By ALAN SQHEK 



Whether from the mountains, 
Or the prairie, or the sea. 
The sunrise and sunset, 
Are like miracles to me. 

And when a garden in the spring. 
Is bursting into bloom, 
It seems to be a tapestry 
On a master-weaver's loom. 

And in the winter, when the snows 
Have covered all in white, 
Purity does seem to reign. 
And say that good is right. 

So, whether a mid-summer's night, 
Or some crisp, cold, winter's morn. 
Forget vour strifes and troubles, and 
Be glad that you were born. 



We are very proud to announce that the following 
graduates have won State Scholarships this year: 



CHARLES COHEN 

HERBERT DYM 

MENDEL GURFEIN 

ISAAC SHERMAN 

DAVID SILBER 

JACOB SILVERMAN 

NOAH TEITELBAUM 



We are equally proud of those graduates who have won State Scholar- 
ships in past years. 



^^ 



— 76 



■ ready work; 
; > V Pilntln: 
Whiti-' Slicot. 



PFING CLERK ASSISTAN ';..;; 

c<rlp ncctr'ca!, 5 aavs. 58 houri .P"" 
;;r, advg ncOMi.".-.;. WA S-5080. 



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Iluent Eni-lish-spanBh.* Leading 
:s Jirm offers permanent position, 
: startlnc salary, advancement 
opportunities; medical, hospitalization, 
other benefits; congenial surroundings. 
Replies held confidential. Mu^t prti 
plete lacts for 



WlOir, 



5pinq Clerks (lO'l, $50-60-7C T"nes Downtown. 

VVK irrv fo WiRRFN ST NYc'^'"'<'"'r '*'<5R. lo $IO,CO0+. Phclls. elhi- 
gyA_AGCV_EO yV ARREN ST , NYC, ^j,^ ^^pj ^_j ^ndwest CO sees here 

HIP CLK, GARM, $60-$65 day:_ojpXy. M ERIDIAN Ag cy 
, j„t Abbye Ascy, 112 W 42.1 ,^^."^''^. »''jP<'L"g 



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OFFICE BOY 



Prtfer H S Junior or Senior 

not plan to attend day collect. 
Exec office: variety chain. Write 

M. H LAf"".TON, Inc. 



ntfrii •laiiicVi' — I 



PURCHASING 



v.ijor pclroleu 



w York hss excellent « 
istaiidlni: Purchssmc As 
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of job purc'na^lnc. Please i 
resume tncludlnc past m 
Your reply Is conlidentlal 

X2563 TIM! 




(§\xv ^yucigngu^a 



d"' niDK' 'D3in2 "nj:i;"i t^•^Po '? v^v^ 




Compliments of . . . 

HRST CONGREGATION 

ANSHE SFARD 

OF BORO PARK 

4502 14th Avenue 
BrooklYn, N. Y. 


Compliments of . . . 

YOUNG ISRAEL 
OF BORO PARK 


Compliments of . . . 

JUDEA CENTER 
SYNAGOGUE 

2059 Bedford Avenue 
Brooklyn 25, New York 

Samuel Bienstock, Pres. 
Dr. Meir Felmon, Rabbi. 


2-:2 TV r.-.ix ;:- i-\:'-: 

To The Jewish Youth 
Belongs The Jewish Future 

Compliments of . . . 

YOUNG ISRAEL 
OF BEDFORD BAY 

2519 Avenue U 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Compliments cf . . . 

YESHIVAH OF 
CROWN HEIGHTS 

The Officers 

and Benjamin Weiser, 
President 


Compliments of . . . 

CONG. SHOMREI EMUNAH 


CONG. CHOVEVEI TORAH 

885 Eastern Parkway 
Brooklyn 13, N. Y. 



Best Wishes to . . . 

LOUIS BERNSTEIN 

from 

Mrs. L. Rubin 

Congratulations to . . . 

LOUIS 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

The Bernstein Family 

Congratulations to . . . 

LOUIS 

from 

W. Brickman & Son 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARVIN 

from 
Mom, Dad and Eileen 



Congratulations to . . . 

SHELDON 

On His Graduation 

Mom and Dad 



Congratulations to . . . 

SHELDON 

On His Graduation 



Carolyn 



Congratulations to . . . 

ELLIOT ABERBACH 

Best Wishes to . . . 

LEON BERNSTEIN 

On His Graduation 

from 
Mother Father and Sisters 



Congratulations to 



LEON 

from 



His Family 



Lots of Luck to . . . 

LEON 
from 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Katz 
and Shimmy 



Congratulations to 



LOUIS 

On His Graduation 



79 — 



Compliments of . . . 


Best Wishes to . . . 


MR. & MRS. A. BODOFF 

In Honor of the Graduation 


CHARLES COHEN 


Of Their Son 
Lionel 


Uncle Sam and Dad 


Best Wishes to . . . 


Congratulations to . . . 


ISHAY 


HERZL EISENSTADT 


Uncle Sam 


Upon His Graduation 




Compliments of . . . 


Congratulations to . . . 


MR. & MRS. H. ERLBAUM 




In Commemoration of their Son 


MR. & MRS. B. BOOK 


Bernard's 




Graduation 


Upon the Graduation 
Of Their Son 




Congratulations to . . . 


Joseph 


MR. & MRS. BOOK 

Upon the Graduation of their Son 
Joseph 


from 

A Group of Friends 


Mr. and Mrs. Brermer 


Best Wishes to . . . 




ISHAY 




Rabbi Nathan Drazin 



— 80 — 



Congratulations to 



MARTIN ELEFANT 

On His Graduation 

from 

Leboiw 6c Elefcmt 

363 7th Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 



Best Wishes of . . . 

A Friend of 
STANLEY FISCHMAN 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. HENRY HERTZ & SON 

to 
Stanley Fischman 

On His Graduation 



Compliments of . . . 

Mr. & Mrs. Friedman 

In Honor of the Graduation 
Of Their Son 

Alfred Friedman 



Best Wishes for a . . . 

Successful Future To Our Son, 

IRWIN 

Mr. & Mrs. David Fogel 
and Roslyn 



A Friend of 



SIDNEY GOLDSTEIN 



Best Wishes to . 



MENDY 



Mom and Dad 



— 81 



Good Luck to the . . . 

GRADUATING CLASS 

from 

Class 2B 


In Honor of the Graduation . . . 

Of Our Nephew 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Neugebom 
and Jerrold David 


In Honor of the Graduation . . . 

Of Our Son 
AARON 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Freiman 
and Grandma 


Congratulations to . . . 

AARON 

On His Graduation 

from 

Grandmother Ida Freiman 


Best of Luck . . . 

To Our Son 
HAROLD FRIEDLANDER 

On His Graduation 

from 

Mom and Dad 


Good Luck to the . . . 

GRADUATING CLASS 

from 

Class GA 

and a Hearty 
"Ahah, Ahah, Ahah," 


Congratulations to . . . 

RICHARD 

Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Garber & Daughter 


Congratulations to . . . 

THE GRADUATING CLASS 

Rabbi Klein 


Success to . . . 

THE GRADUATES OF 1952 

Mr. and Mrs. Elias M. Felig 



A Friend of 



NEIL ISRAEL 



Lots o( Luck to . . , 

Our Dear Son 

NEIL 

On His Graduation 

from 

Mother and Father 



A friend of . . . 

A. KEVELSON 



Congratulations to . . . 

HAROLD KIRSH 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Moses 
and Mr. and Mrs. Young 



Compliments & Best Wishes to 



HAROLD KIRSH 



Upon His Graduation 



Aunt Eva and Uncle Sidney 



Congratulations to . , . 

THE GRADUATING CLASS 

from 

The Shield A.C. 
Pres. H. Lenchitz 



Best Wishes to . . . 

Our Son 
NORMAN 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Mother and Dad 



Best Wishes to . . . 

NORMAN GROSS 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Schwartz 

To . , , 

ARNOLD and SEYMOUR 

On Their Graduation 
from 

Mother and Father 



In Honor of 



The Graduation Of Our Son 



JACOB 



Mr. and Mrs. Elias Heller 



Congratulations to . . . 
Our Son 

JUDAH 

Upon His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. HYman Klein 



Congratulations to 



JULIE 



Mom and Dad 



Best Wishes to . . . 

IRWIN MORDECAI 

from 

Mother & Father 
Aaron & Carolyn Nathan 
Selma & William Horowitz 
Leila & Joel Hart 



To 



MORTY KWESTEL 

from 



A Friend 



Congratulations to . . , 

Our Son 

KTVY 

Upon His Graduation 

Mother and Dad 



Continued Success To You 



ELLIOTT 



Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Levine 



Best Wishes To All 



On Behalf Of The 



NEMERSON FAMILY 



Congratulations . . . 


A Friend of . . . 


BOBBY 




On Your Graduation 


AVROM REICHMAN 


from 




High School 




Mother and Dad 






Compliments of . . . 


Compliments from . . . 






Mr. & Mrs. Alex Eisenberg 


'a Friend Of 






to 


STANLEY ROSENBERG 


HAROLD RICHTMAN 



85 





Best Wishes to . . . 


Compliments of . . . 






JOEL 




Upon His Graduation 


Mr. & Mrs. S. Seelenireund 






from 


and Family 






Dr. and Mrs. Carl Rispler 




With Best Wishes for . . . 


In Honor of the Graduation 


A Bright Future 




to 


Of Their Son 


AVROM REICHMAN 




Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sacks 


JERRY 


and Family 


Congratulations to . . . 




BERNARD ROSENBAUM 




On His Graduation 


Congratulations to . . . 


To . . . 




DAVID 


DAVID 


On His Graduation 


From His Parents 


Uncle Harry and Aunt Anne 






Good Luck to . . . 


Mr. and Mrs. S. Silber 


JACKIE SILVERMAN 




Mary and Irving Silverman 




CompHments of . . . 


From a Friend of . . . 


MR. & MRS. J. SMITH 




In Honor Of 


STANLEY ROSENBERG 


Eliott Spar 


A Friend of . . . 




MORRIS STILLMAN 



— 86 — 



Best Wishes to . . . 

JOSHUA TEITELBAUM 

from 

Cousins 
Essy & Morris Beeber & FamilY 

Best Wishes to . . . 

JOSHUA 



His Uncles & Aunts 

Bernard <& Elizabeth Teitelbaum 
Isroel & Florence Teitelbaum 
Simcha & Rose Teitelbaum 
Matthew & Sonia Mandelbaum 



Congratulations to . . . 

MORRIS 

On His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Stillman 
and Sheila 

Congratulations to . . . 

N. JOSHUA TEITELBAUM 

irom 

Mr. & Mrs. Shiffman 

3706 Ave. S Brooklyn 

Congratulations to . . . 

JOSHUA 
from 
Mendy, Lucia & Ira Joseph Kroo 

Best Wishes to . . . 

JOSHUA TEITELBAUM 

from 

The Rosenblum Family 

Paterson, N. J 



Congratulations to . 



JOSHUA 



From His Grandmothers 

Mrs. Choyn Teitelbaum 
Mrs. Sarah Meyerowitz 



Congratulations to . . . 

Our Dearest Son 
SAMMY 

In Honor of His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Wagshal 



Congratulations to . . . 

JOSHUA 

from 

Adelmon Family 

1089 East 17th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congratulations to . . . 

JOSHUA TEITELBAUM 

from 

Tonteh Chaytse 

In Honor of . . . 

Their Son 
MARTIN'S 
Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Wunderlich 

In Honor of . . . 

MARTIN WUNDERLICH'S 

Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Goldberg 
and Family 



— 87 



In Honor of . . . 

Martin Wunderlich 

On His Graduation 
Mr. Oscar Hartman & Family 


Compliments of . . . 

Mr. & Mrs. Zelelsky 

In Honor of Their Son 

MELVIN'S 

Graduation 


Congratulations to . . . 
Our Son 

STANLEY 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Zahner 


In Memory of . . . 

V. BECKER 


In Loving Memory of . . . 
My Father 

Miriam Warshaw 


Best Wishes to . . . 

STANLEY ZAHNER 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Bassiur 
and Daughters 


In Memory of . . . 

My Grandparents 

Nathan and Sarah Sharashoff 


Congratulations to . . . 
MELVIN 
from 
The Walsh Family Circle 


Congratulations to . . . 

MELVIN 

from 

The Goldberg Family 


In Memory of . . . 

Our Dear Beloved Parents 

The Telsey Family & 
Grandchildren 


A FREND 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. SAM KLEIN 



2227 78th Street 



Brooklyn, New York 



89 



IRVING KEVELSON 

NAT KEVELSON 

AL KEVELSON 



^^ 



ACE ASBESTOS MFG., CO. 

451 Communipaw Avenue 
Jersey City, New Jersey 



— 90 — 



;'■ 










i 




In Memory of Our Beloved Father & Mother 


I 




MENDEL & HANA HAUSMAN 






Who Hare Demonstrated During Their Lifetime An 






Unselfjsh Devotion to the Cause of Tor ah and 






have Taught us to do likeivise. We are 






Happy to follow their Teachings. 






MR. & MRS. NATHAN HAUSMAN 






MR. & MRS. BENJAMIN KATZ 






MR. & MRS. MAX AUSTER 






MR. & MRS. PAUL KWESTEL 






AND OUR CHILDREN 


i 
i 



Congratulations to . 

JOSEPH 

Upon His Graduation 



from 
Fleming-Jaffe Ltd. 




WhWumiu. 



mmmmmmsm 



Famous for Continental Chocolates 



Greetings from 



BARTOJJ 



53 retail chocolate shops in New York, 
Newark and Detroit. Closed on the Sabbath 
and all Jewish holidays. Open Sundays. 



KANDEL, SCHAEFFER CO. 

Certified Public Accountants 

Empire State Building 
New York 1, N.Y. 

LAckawanna 4-9495-6 



91 — 



YOUNG MOTORS.. INC. 

DE SOTO • PLYMOUTH 

1679-89 Bedford Avenue 

Opposite Ebbets Field 

Brooklyn 25, N.Y. 



SAMUEL WAGER 



BUckmmster 4-4444, 7-9700 





Best Wishes . . . 


BESTFORM FOUNDATIONS 




Inc. 






MR. & MRS. MAX DOFT 


9 




64-74 West 23rd Street 




New York 16, N. Y. 





92 



Compliments of . . . 




MR. MARTIN KLEIN 


SAM SCHF.TNMAN 


AND FAMILY 


AND FAMILY 


Compliments of . . . 








Milrose 


Rambam 




Chateau 


Auditorium 


SCHOCHTIM UNION 


1830 Pitkin Ave. 


3121 Kings H'way 


OF GREATER NEW YORK 


Brooklyn 12, N.Y. 


Brooklyn 10, N.Y. 


Local 730 A. F. L. 


HY 8-2980 


NA 8-3972 


799 Broadway 


-IK'S 


GRamercY 3-4294 


Catering For Weddings 




Confirmations, Banquets 


E. Meltzer President 




M. Goodman Vice President 




M. Leiter Secretary 


Rabbi H. J. Hirsch & Weltman 


G. Lederman Manager 


Caterers 



YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 
WOMEN'S ORGANIZATION 

Brooklyn Division 



Mrs. Joseph Greenberg 
President 



GE 6-4797 - 0332 J. Rosenfeld 

BEDDING 
MANUFACTURER'S OUTLET 

Direct from Factory to You 

Mattresses* - Quilts - Pillows 

Specializing in the remaking of 

Mattresses, etc. 

4306-8 12th Ave. B'klyn 19, N.Y. 
Compliments of . . . 

BERDIE'S CORSET SHOPPE 

384 Kingston Ave. Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Tel: PR 3- 



air-conditioned 



BERT AND HELEN'S 
CANDY STORE 

"Service With A Smile" 
Bedford Ave. corner President St. 



BLECHER AND LISS 

Kosher Meats and Poultry 
Market 



303 Albany Ave. 



PR 4- 



Greetings From . . . 

BLOCK PUBLISHING COMP. 

America's Headquarters of 
Hebrcrica & Judaica 

Send for Catalogues and Bloch's 
Book Bulletin 

31 West 31st St. Nev^ York 1, N.Y. 
Tel: LOngacre 4-2040 



DR. & MRS. O. H. BLOOM 



I 



closed on Saturdays 



94 





Compliments ot . . . 


MR. and MRS. 




LOUIS CHESIR 


BENJE FLAMMEY 


and FAMILY 






Compliments of . . . 


CHILDHOOD 


DR. & MRS. H. S. FRANK 


NURSERY PRODUCTS 


AND DAUGHTERS 


471 4th Avenue 


Floria, Anita and Deborah 


New York City 






(Humor Editor of Elchanite 1930) 


A. J. Rabinowitz, Ph. G. 


Compliments of . . . 


DONGAN HILLS PHARMACY 


FREEMAN FURNITURE CO. 


1647 Richmond Road 


402 E. 64th Street 


Dongan Hills, S. I. N. Y. 


New York City 


Phones: Dongan Hills 6-0083 - 0314 




Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 




FRIEDMAN, GORDON, 


MR. B. DUBROW 


& FRIEDMAN 



93 — 



Use "CAREER'S MISROCHI' 

Peanut Oil, Pareve Fat, 
Preserves, Honey, etc. 

The favorite in all Jewish Homes 



Compliments of . . . 

HYMAN GORDON 
ELI GURSEN & FAMILY 



MR. & MRS. BEN GREENBERG 



HERZOG'S CLOTHES 

4209 Thirteenth Avenue 
Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 



LITTLE FOLKS 
GI Foot Wear Co. 

37 West 20th St. 
New York 11, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. SIDNEY INDYK 
AND SONS 

115 Langham St. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



MARROW 

FOUNDATION 

INC. 



Greetings 



CAROL ANN 

and 
ALVIN MARTZ 



96 



Compliments of . . 



SAM MICHAELS & SONS 



Phone; GE. 6-0560 



CAMP MONROE 

For Boys & Girls 

Monroe, N.Y. 

Rabbi H. S. Port & Joseph Kriger 
Directors 

FINEST KOSHER CUISINE 

Office: 1330 — 52nd St. 
Brooklyn N.Y. 



PAUL COHEN CO. INC. 

881 Broadway 
New York 3, N.Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

CUMBERLAND 
PACKING CORP. 



FROM A FRIEND 



Bar Mitzvah Party 

Sweet Sixteen Party? 

Any Party? 

Let 
HERSHI'S KNISHOP, INC. 

Cater it for you. 

4903 12th Avenue 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
GE. 8-9650 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. SAMUEL HONIG 




Compliments of . . . 


For The Best of Spirits 




For Your Simchas 


MR. <S MRS. SIDNEY INDYK 


LINCOLN 


AND SONS 


WINES & LIQUORS 


115 Longham Street 


Imported & Domestic 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


407 Tompkins Avenue, B'klyn, N.Y. 
near Jefferson St. 


NA. 8-3627 We Buy and Sell 
Antiques & Furniture 




A. KASOWSKY 


LINOLEUM PRODUCTS 


Decder in 


CORP. 


ARTS, GIFTS and ANTIQUES 




furniture - furnishing - brica-a-bracs 


1006 Clinton St. 


Special Prices for Decorators 


Hoboken, N.J. 


1475 Coney Island Ave. 
Brooklyn 30, N.Y., near Ave. K. 




Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 


MR. & MRS. OSCAR KRAVITZ 


MONROE SUPPT-TES CO.. INC. 


Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 


MR. <S MRS. HAROLD LEVINE 


QUEENSBORO MILLS CO. 


AND FAMILY 





9S 



I 



In Honor Of Our 
Father and Mother 

CAROL <S JUDY 
ROSENZWEIG 


Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. SAM SHINENSKY 


Compliments of . . . 

DR. & MRS. 
DAVID SCHWARTZ & SONS 


H & S SILVERMAN 

883 Nostrand Ave. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Compliments of . . . 

SENECA SPORTSWEAR 

1199 Broadway 
N.Y.C. 


A Friend of 

MR. & MRS. 
NATHAN STEINMETZ 


Compliments of . . . 

ISAAC SHALOM 


Milk Delivered to the 
Home Country Bottled 

Try it and be convinced 

YORK CREAMERIES 

885 East 5Ist St. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

UL. 6-4058 



99 



A. C. DESK Co. 

Office Furniture and Slate Glass 
63 Pearl St., N.Y.C. 



AMERICAN STANDARD 
INK & GOLD STAMPING, Co., Inc. 

GR. 5-6737 

Gold Stamping of Every Description 

Hat Stickers Our Specialty 

16 W. 4th St. New York 12, N.Y. 



MAX ARONOVrrZ 

2162 — 2nd Avenue 



ATLANTIC CLOTHING Co., Man. 

1 Allen St., N.Y.C. 

Ben Feinstein 

BArclay 7-8918-9 

ATLANTIC CLOTHING Co., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

"Allen Park" — "Baychester" 

1 Allen Street 

Murray Werber New York 2, N.Y. 

B. AND B. FOOD SHOP 

Dairy — Grocery — Appetizers 
270 Kingston Ave., Brooklyn 



BABYTOWNE 

470 Pulaski Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



BARNET PHARMACY 

5102 15 Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

GE. 8-9558 GE. 8-9767 



DR. F. G. BASS 

296 Schenectady Ave. 
Brooklyn 



MILTON BAUM 

Sleepy Suzy Inc. 
Lingerie 



BECHER CLOTHES 

For Men and Boys 
4213 13 Ave., Brooklyn 

Closed Saturdays 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. HAROLD A. BERMAN 
and FAMILY 



MR. & MRS. G. BERNKNOPF 



Compliments of . . . 

SOLOMON BERNSTIEN & FAMILY 

1335 47th Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



ABRAHAM BLAU 

Licensed Undertaker 
410 Grand St., N.Y.C. 

Shomer Shabbos 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. <S MRS. GEORGE S. BLEAMAN 
and FAMILY 

Minna, Libby & Phillip 



I 



100 — 



BRENNER'S MONUMENTAL WORKS 

4921 - 12th Ave., B'klyn 
Closed Saturday and Jewish Holidays 

GE.. 8-7 126 


MR. & MRS. M. DIAMOND 


MR. & MRS. A. BROFMAN 

1347 -48th Street 
New York City 


DORA'S SPECIALTY SHOP 

2208 - Ave. X 
Brooklyn 35, N. Y. 


CATON SERVICENTER 

Coney Island Ave, and Caton Ave. 
Brooklyn 

GE 8-8823 


E. L DU PONT DE NEMOURS & Co., 
INC. 

Van Dam St. & 48th Ave. 
Long Island City 1, NY. 
Phone ST 6-0200 


CHOPEUX DE MOCHE 

Millinery — Blouses — Sportswear 
4882 -13th Ave., Brooklyn 


DYCKMAN'S 

Watches and Diamonds 
73 V/. 47th St., N.Y.C. 


CIRCUS AQUARIUM 

Tropical Fish — Tanks — Food 
847 Franklin Ave, B'klyn. 

ST 3-9376 


L. EDISON 

1625 47th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


emeus BOX 

Games— Toys— Dolls— Hobby Cratt 
847 Franklin Ave., B'klyn. 

ST 3-9376 


ELWOOD HABERDASHERS 

Men and Boys Wear 
5115 13th Ave.,B'klyn. 

closed Saturdays 


IN MEMORY 

OF A LOST SUMMER 

CHARLES I. COHEN 


EMPIRE CUSTOM HATTERS 

Finest Custom Mode Hats 

316 Kingston Avenue 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 


MR. & MRS. COHEN & SONS 

427 Summit Ave. 
Cedarhurst, N. Y. 


Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. MORRIS FEDER 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. FEIGELMAN 


GARB DAIRY PRODUCTS 


FEIT and JAffE 

810 Washington Ave. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Compliments of , . . 

MR. & MRS. FRANCISCO GLUCK 

1340 President Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


FERNDALE FARMS Inc. 

Milk-and-Milk Products 
219 Liberty Ave., Brooklyn 


Compliments of G. O. Candidates . . . 

MICHA BOTKNECHT 
JOSEF E. FISCHER 
NAHUM GORDON 

ZALMAN SCHRADER 


Compliments of . . . 

P. FLAMMEY 


Compliments of . . 

MR. & MRS. GOLIGER 
and FAMILY 


A FORMER STUDENT 


Compliments of . . . 

GREENBAUM'S GROCERY 

61 Church Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Weddings, Parties & Bar Mitzvahs 

L. FREEDMAN 

Delicatessen & Restaurant 
STEAKS & CHOPS OUR SPECIALTY 

PR 3-9618 881 Nostrand Ave. 


THE GROSS FAMILY 

1102 -56th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Best Wishes from . . . 

A Friend of the Yeshiva 


GROSSMAN'S CLOTHES SHOP 

1914 -3rd Ave., N.Y.C. 
Smart clothing for men - ladies - boys 


Compliments of . . . 
MR. & MRS. FRUCHTHANDLER 


C. HALBFINGER 

Reliable Toy and Stationary Store 
125 Utica Ave., Brooklyn 



102 



JACK'S 

Quality Fruits <S Vegetables 

5009 13th Avenue 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



JOCHNOWITZ 

Butter and Eggs Co. 

Greetings from . . - 

DAVID KATZOFF 

Chiropractor 

DE 9-4532 

Compliments of . . . 

RABBI & MRS. A. KLEIN 

2841 W. 5th Street 
Brooklyn 24, N. Y. 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. SAM KOPEL 



MR. & MRS. M. KOTKES 



KRESSNER POULTRY & EGG CO. 

"The Freshest Eggs on the Market" 



DAVID KRIEMAN 

4722 Snyder Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

RABBI & MRS. EMANUEL LAZAR 

683 Essex Street 
Brooklyn 8, N. Y. 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. MAURICE LEBOWITZ 
and FAMILY 

1266 45th Street 
Brooklyn 11, N. Y, 



THE LEVINE FAMILY 



LEWIS and ROSENTHAL 

Leather 
101 -Gold St., N.Y.C. 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. CHARLES LISS 
NORMAN and SYLVIA 



The only Shomer Shabbos milkman 
in Boro Park 

MR. J. LOWENHEIM 

GE 5-9840 



Compliments of . . . 

WILLIAM MARKOWITZ 

456 De Witt Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



DR. & MRS. J. MAYER 



Compliments of . . . 

DONALD MAYERSON 


Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. MORRIS OLSHIN 


D. Mn.T.ER 

13 Essex St., N.Y.C. 
Home of Kosher Cheese 


Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. BEN PECHMAN 


Compliments of . . . 

NATIONAL GIFT SHOPS 

4510-24 13th Avenue 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y, 


PHILLIP'S DAIRY 

1908 Avenue U 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


MRS. JENNIE NEUSTADTER 


MR. <S MRS. S. POLSTEIN 


MR. & MRS. M. NEUSTADTER 
and FAMILY 


DR. & MRS. E. RAPPAPORT 


Compliments of . . . 

NU-ART DENTAL LABORATORY 


RICHMOND 
PAPER and TWINE CO. 


Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. JACOB OLSHIN 


ABRAHAM RIESS 

Public Accountant 
611 Bedford Ave., B'klyn, N. Y. 


MAX OLSHIN 


SAN MARTINA WINES 

79 Warburton Avenue 
Yonkers, N. Y, 



— 104 



Compliments ol 



B. SARACHEK 

Sporting Goods 



MR. & MRS. 
MORRIS SCHEDNfBERG 



MARK SCHENK 

3342 Bedford Ave. 
Brooklyn 10, N. Y. 



SCHLESEMGER 

Meat & Poultry Market 
5504 16th Avenue 



Bet. 55 & 56 Sts. 



B'klyn. 4, N.Y. 



SELDOWITZ and ZIFF 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. CHARLES SEGAL 

1379 E. 8th Street 
Brooklyn 30, N. Y. 



ISRAEL SKILOWITZ and SONS 

Manufacturers of Kosher Smoked 

Meat Products 

4914 - 13th Ave., Brooklyn 



SMITH BENNY SALES CO. 

11 W. 42nd Street, N.Y.C. 

CH 4-1642 



MR. & MRS. SAM SOBEL 

183 Beach 68 Street 
Rockaway, Queens 



S & P FRUITERERS 

1921 Avenue U 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Greetings to . . . 

Seymour and Leonard Richter 



MR. & MRS. SPILKY 



MR. & MRS. D. STEINBERG 
and MYRNA 



SUZANNE SHOE OUTLET 

2217a Ave X. B'klyn 



fe have a complete line of 
high quality shoes 



U.S. TAG CO. 

552 W. Broadviray 
New York 12, N.Y, 



RABBI & MRS. S. L. TEITELBAUM 
and ZIPPORAH 



GEORGE TELSEY 

Linoleum and Inlaid 

4826 -3rd Avenue 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



— 105 — 



Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. J. WEISELMAN 



Mr. Louis Beer 

Belmont Bakery 

Paul Bidinger 

Herbie Blatt 

Brief Bakery 

Brooks Pharmacy 

Chick's Bicycle Store 

Dr. Harry G. Chodroff 

Davette & Elliott Cohen 

Datz Pharmacy 

Deutch & Benny's Meat Market 

Miss Duhl 

E. & L. Self-Service Grocery 

Engelman Meat Market 

Englard 

Abraham & Jeanette Erlbaum 

Hyman 1. Folk D.D.S. 

Famous Beers Inc. 

Feldman's Grocery 

Mr. Samuel Feuer 

Gerald Fogel Jewelry 

Mr. & Mrs. M. Freedman 

Mr. A. Friedman 

Roberta & Leslie Gier 

Goldberg's French Cleaners 

Goldfarb's Bakery 

Goldstein's Bakery 

M. Greenwald — Kosher Meat 

J. Grossberg's Pharmacy 

Herman's Pharmacy 

S. Hoffman's Uncle 

I G. Lamd Mfg. Co. 

Irving's Fruit Market 

Kaplan Bros. 

Kaplan's Fish Mkt. 

Lobelia Kaufman 

Mr. & Mrs. Phillip Kipust 



MRS. ROBERTA L. ZUCKERBERG 

tendered a Bar Mitzvoh party to all 
of Hyam' friends on Sunday Sept. 
23, 1951. 



Emanuel Lebowitz 

Levy's Grocery 

Louis' Delicatessen 

Mr. & Mrs. Fred Lowenstien & Son 

Eli Mackta 

H. Marcus 

Donald Mayerson 

Mr. & Mrs. S. Mehl & Family 

Melnick & Levenson Meats 

Mrs. Gussie Mindlin 

Mr. & Mrs. Isaac Newman 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Newman 

Beulah & Phillis Olshin 

Nathan Olshin 

Paul & Harry's Luncheonette 

Peggy & Rollies Candy Store 

Dr. Pelner 

Mr. L. Saclow 

Saxon's Pharmacy 

Allan Scher 

L. Schneider's friend 

E. Schren 

Semal & Son Grocery 

Singer's Pharmacy 

Mr. & Mrs. Siegal & Daughters 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Silber 

Joseph Tanowitz 

Mr. & Mrs. M. Trenk 

M. Wolfish 

Jack Weilgus 

Weise Photographers 

Windsor Lumber & Trim Corp. 

Windsor Pants Shop 

Young's Bakery 

Zewkil's Fish Market 

Louis Zdatney 



106 



DEPARTMENT oc- ^, 



^^.